Connie Crothers

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Connie Crothers
Loz-crothers-crop.png
Connie Crothers at a gallery in the Lower East Side, New York City, 2015
Background information
Born(1941-06-02)June 2, 1941
Palo Alto, California, U.S.
Died(2016-08-13)August 13, 2016
New York City, New York, U.S.
GenresAvant-garde jazz, free jazz
Occupation(s)Musician, composer, educator
InstrumentsPiano
Years active1972–2016
LabelsSteepleChase, New Artists
Associated actsLennie Tristano, Richard Tabnik
Websitewww.conniecrothers.net

Connie Crothers (May 2, 1941 – August 13, 2016) was an American jazz pianist.

Early life[edit]

Crothers began studying classical piano at age 9 and went on to major in composition at the University of California, Berkeley. At Berkeley, her teachers emphasized "procedure and structure" and "compositional rigor" over emotional expression, which did not sit well with Crothers.[1] She later became a student of Lennie Tristano.[2][3]

Later life and career[edit]

After Tristano's death in November 1978, Crothers founded the Lennie Jazz Foundation and recorded a memorial concert album in his honor.[3][4]

In 1982 she recorded an album with drummer Max Roach for New Artists Records, a label she and Roach founded. She also recorded in groups with, among others, Richard Tabnik and Cameron Brown.[3][5]

Crothers died of lung cancer in Manhattan on August 13, 2016.[6][3]

Discography[edit]

As leader/co-leader[edit]

Year recorded Title Label Notes
1974 Perception SteepleChase Trio, with Joe Solomon (bass), Roger Mancuso (drums)
1980? Solo Jazz
1982 Swish New Artists Duo, with Max Roach (drums)
1984 Concert at Cooper Union Orchard Solo piano
1985 Duo Dimension New Artists Duo, with Richard Tabnik (alto sax)
1988 Love Energy New Artists Quartet, with Lenny Popkin (tenor sax), Cameron Brown (bass), Carol Tristano (drums)
1989 New York Night Orchard Quartet, with Lenny Popkin (tenor sax), Cameron Brown (bass), Carol Tristano (drums)
1989 In Motion Orchard Quartet, with Lenny Popkin (tenor sax), Cameron Brown (bass), Carol Tristano (drums)
1993 Jazz Spring Orchard Quartet, with Lenny Popkin (tenor sax), Cameron Brown (bass), Carol Tristano (drums)
1993–94 Deep into the Center New Artists Duo, with Roger Mancuso (drums)
1993–96 Music from Everyday Life New Artists Solo piano
1996 Session New Artists Quartet, with Lenny Popkin (tenor sax), Rich Califano (bass), Carol Tristano (drums)
1997? Just for the Joy of It with Bob Casanova
1998–99 Ontology New Artists Quartet, with Richard Tabnik (alto sax), Sean Smith (bass), Roger Mancuso (drums)
1999? Notes from New York
2005 Music Is a Place New Artists Quartet, with Richard Tabnik (alto sax), Ratzo Harris (bass), Roger Mancuso (drums)
2005 Live at Outpost Performance Space New Artists Quartet, with Richard Tabnik (alto sax), Ratzo Harris (bass), Roger Mancuso (drums); in concert
2007? Conversations New Artists
2010? Session at 475 Kent Mutable Music
2011? Live at the Freight New Artists Duo, with Jessica Jones (tenor sax); in concert
2011? Spontaneous Suites for Two Pianos Rogue Art Duo, with David Arner (piano)
2012? Hippin' New Artists

Sources:[7][8]

As sidewoman[edit]

  • 1992? Lennie Tristano Memorial Concert, Tristanos Disciples
  • 1999? The Way I Am, Linda Satin
  • 2002? Primal Elegance, Bud Tristano[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Women in Jazz Book Project: Connie Crothers: A Queen At Her Throne". Women in Jazz Book Project. Retrieved 2016-08-17.
  2. ^ "New Artists Records Biographies". New Artists Records. Archived from the original on 2016-03-03. Retrieved 2016-08-17.
  3. ^ a b c d Kelsey, Chris. "Connie Crothers profile". AllMusic. Retrieved November 19, 2016.
  4. ^ Eunmi Shim (1997-06-21). "Lennie Tristano: His Life in Music". Books.google.com. p. 122. Retrieved 2016-08-17.
  5. ^ "Time Out New York". Time Out New York. Retrieved 2016-08-17.
  6. ^ "Pianistin Connie Crothers 75-jährig an Krebs verstorben". Jazz Pages (in German). August 14, 2016. Retrieved August 15, 2016.
  7. ^ "Connie Crothers discography". AllMusic. Retrieved November 19, 2016.
  8. ^ Cook, Richard; Morton, Brian (2008). The Penguin Guide to Jazz Recordings (9th ed.). Penguin. pp. 321–322. ISBN 978-0-141-03401-0.
  9. ^ "Connie Crothers credits". AllMusic. Retrieved November 19, 2016.

External links[edit]