Coracoacromial ligament

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Coracoacromial ligament
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The left shoulder and acromioclavicular joints, and the proper ligaments of the scapula. (Coraco-acromial visible at upper right.)
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Glenoid fossa of right side.
Details
Fromcoracoid process
Toacromion
Identifiers
Latinligamentum coracoacromiale
TA98A03.5.01.002
TA21740
FMA25943
Anatomical terminology

The coracoacromial ligament is a strong triangular ligament between the coracoid process and the acromion.

Structure[edit]

The coracoacromial ligament originates from the summit of the acromion of the scapula, just in front of the articular surface for the clavicle.[1] It inserts by its broad base along the whole length of the lateral border of the coracoid process of the scapula.[1]

It is in relation, above, with the clavicle and under surface of the deltoid muscle; below, with the tendon of the supraspinatus, a bursa being interposed.

Its lateral border is continuous with a dense lamina that passes beneath the deltoid muscle upon the tendons of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus.

The ligament is sometimes described as consisting of two marginal bands and a thinner intervening portion, the two bands being attached respectively to the apex and the base of the coracoid process, and joining together at the acromion.

When the pectoralis minor is inserted, as occasionally is the case, into the capsule of the shoulder-joint instead of into the coracoid process, it passes between these two bands, and the intervening portion of the ligament is then deficient.

Function[edit]

Together with the coracoid process and the acromion, the coracoacromial ligament forms a vault for the protection of the head of the humerus.

References[edit]

Public domain This article incorporates text in the public domain from page 316 of the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy (1918)

  1. ^ a b Waldman, Steven D. (2014-01-01). "Chapter 30 - Subacromial Impingement Syndrome". Atlas of Uncommon Pain Syndromes. Saunders. pp. 81–85. doi:10.1016/b978-1-4557-0999-1.00030-7. ISBN 978-1-4557-0999-1.CS1 maint: date and year (link)

External links[edit]