DICE framework

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The DICE framework is a tool originally developed by Perry Keenan, Kathleen Conlon, and Alan Jackson (all current or former Partners at The Boston Consulting Group[1]). It was originally published in the Harvard Business Review (HBR) article "The Hard Side of Change"[2] in 2005 and has been republished in HBR's "Lead Change--Successfully",[3] HBR's OnPoint Magazine[4] and recognized in HBR's "10 Must Reads on Change Management"[5] publication. The DICE framework was awarded a patent in 2014.[6]

A DICE score is a leading indicator of the likely success of a project based on objective measures.[7] The DICE framework allows for consistency in evaluating various projects (even though the inputs are subjective) and the framework can be used to track projects, manage portfolios of projects, and force the right conversations.[8] The power in the DICE framework is that it initiates a real two-way conversation at multiple levels of an organization. With enormous pressure on employees' time, this simple tool provides an efficient way to target potential issues before they cause a project to go off-course. Using this framework, leaders can predict and manipulate project outcomes and allocate resources strategically to maximize delivery of an overall program or portfolio of initiatives. Ultimately, DICE is an extremely powerful tool for an organization's leadership to manage change programs and the implementation of strategic initiatives.

Although originally developed at The Boston Consulting Group (BCG),[9] this framework has become widely adopted[10] and is used by many companies and professionals.

DICE Acronym[edit]

The acronym DICE stands for:

Duration (D)
either the total duration of short projects, or the time between two milestones on longer projects
Team Performance Integrity (I)
the project team's ability to execute successfully, with specific emphasis on the ability of the project leader
Commitment (C)
levels of support, composed of two factors:
C1 visible backing from the sponsor and senior executives for the change
C2 support from those who are impacted by the change
Effort (E)
how much effort will it require to implement (above and beyond business as usual)

Calculation[edit]

Based on the statistical analysis from the outcome of change projects, success can be determined by assessing four factors (duration, team performance integrity, commitment, and effort). A DICE score between 7 and 14 is in the "Win" Zone (very likely to succeed), while a DICE score between 14 and 17 falls in the "Worry" Zone (hard to predict success), and a DICE score higher than 17 falls in the "Woe" Zone (indicating high unpredictability or likely to not succeed).[11] The DICE score is calculated according to the following formula:[12]

D + (2 x I) + (2 x C1) + C2 + E
Duration
< 2 months = 1
2-4 months = 2
4-8 months = 3
> 8 months = 4
Team Performance Integrity
Very good = 1
Good = 2
Average = 3
Poor = 4
Commitment (Senior Management)
Clearly and strongly communicate the need = 1
Seem to want success = 2
Neutral = 3
Reluctant = 4
Commitment (Local)
Eager = 1
Willing = 2
Reluctant = 3
Strongly Reluctant = 4
Effort
< 10% additional = 1
10-20% additional = 2
20-40% additional = 3
> 40 % additional = 4

References[edit]

  1. ^ Banhegyi, Stephen George and Eugenie May (April 2007). The Art and Science of Change. STS Trust. p. 97. ISBN 0-9802550-3-1. 
  2. ^ Sirkin, Harold; Keenan, Perry; Jackson, Alan. "The Hard Side of Change Management". Harvard Business Review. Harvard Business Review. Retrieved October 2005.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  3. ^ Lead Change--Successfully (2 ed.). Harvard Business Review. 
  4. ^ "Leading Change: What Works and What Doesn't". Harvard Business Review. [permanent dead link]
  5. ^ "HBR's 10 Must Reads on Change Management". Harvard Business Review. 
  6. ^ "DICE Patent". United States Patent and Trademark Office, USPTO. [permanent dead link]
  7. ^ Concas, Giulio; Giulio Concas; Ernesto Damiani; Marco Scotto (June 2007). Agile Processes in Software Engineering and Extreme Programming. Springer. p. 144. ISBN 3-540-73100-8. 
  8. ^ Sirkin, Harold; Keenan, Perry; Jackson, Alan. "The Hard Side of Change Management". Harvard Business Review. Harvard Business Review. Retrieved October 2005.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  9. ^ Banhegyi, Stephen George and Eugenie May (April 2007). The Art and Science of Change. STS Trust. p. 97. ISBN 0-9802550-3-1. 
  10. ^ Extreme Programming and Agile Processes in Software Engineering. Springer. July 26, 2006. pp. 116–121. ISBN 3540350942. 
  11. ^ Sirkin, Harold; Keenan, Perry; Jackson, Alan. "The Hard Side of Change Management". Harvard Business Review. Harvard Business Review. Retrieved October 2005.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  12. ^ Sirkin, Harold; Keenan, Perry; Jackson, Alan. "The Hard Side of Change Management". DICE - How to Beat the Odds in Program Execution. The Boston Consulting Group. Archived from the original on 2009-10-15. Retrieved October 2005.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)