David Dinwoodie

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

David W. Dinwoodie (born November 11, 1965) is an American anthropologist specializing in the Chilcotin First Nation in British Columbia, Canada.[1] He received his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago, where he studied under Raymond D. Fogelson. He teaches anthropology at the University of New Mexico.[2]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Dinwoodie, David (1999) Authorizing Voices: Going Public in an Indigenous Language. Cultural Anthropology 13(2):193-223. 1998.
  • Dinwoodie, David (1999) Textuality and the ‘Voices’ of Informants: The Case of Edward Sapir’s 1929 Navajo, 1999.
  • Dinwoodie, David (2002) Reserve Memories: The Power of the Past in a Chilcotin Community. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.
  • Dinwoodie, David (2003) Navajo Linguist. Anthropological Linguistics 45.4:427-49. 2003.
  • Kan, Sergei A., and Pauline Turner Strong, eds. (2006) New Perspectives on Native North America: Cultures, Histories, and Representations. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Reserve Memories: The Power of the Past in a Chilcotin Community books.google.co.uk. Retrieved January 2011
  2. ^ David W. Dinwoodie University of New Mexico. Retrieved January 2011