David Henry Goodsall

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David Henry Goodsall (4 January 1843, Gravesend – 14 September 1906, London) was an English surgeon who is remembered for describing Goodsall's rule.

Biography[edit]

David Goodsall was born in Gravesend, and educated at St. Ann's School. His father had decided to study medicine, but died while he was a student at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, as a result of a wound sustained while performing a post mortem examination. As a result, David Goodsall's fees at St. Bartholomews were waived, as his father's wound was inflicted by a member of staff, and he studied medicine there from 1865.[1] He became house surgeon at St. Mark's Hospital in 1870, a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons in 1872, and full surgeon in 1888. He developed an interest in rectal surgery, writing a chapter in Diseases of the Anus and Rectum in which Goodsall's rule is described.[2] He is thought to have died of a myocardial infarction in 1906.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ David Henry Goodsall F.R.C.S. Br Med J. 1906 September 29; 2 (2387): 812-813.
  2. ^ David H. Goodsall, W. Ernest Miles. Diseases of the Anus and Rectum. Longmans, Green & Co., 1900.
  3. ^ Marvin L. Corman. Colon and Rectal Surgery, page 298. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2005. Google books