Dean Hill Anticline

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The Dean Hill Anticline is an east-west trending fold in the Cretaceous chalk of Hampshire. It lies immediately to the north of the Hampshire Basin and south of Salisbury Plain.

Structure[edit]

The anticline runs west 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) from the River Test near Lockerley along the northern rim of the Hampshire Basin, to the south of a narrow strip of palaeogene rocks, the Alderbury-Mottisfont Syncline.[1][2] At the eastern end under the Test Valley it is cut by the northward-swinging Portsdown Anticline. At the western end to the south-east of Salisbury the structure is cut by the Mere Fault.[3]

In the core the Santonian Newhaven Chalk Formation reaches the surface.[1][2] In the outer limits near Whiteparish chalk as young as the Campanian Portsdown Chalk Formation is found.

Hills include Witherington Down, Pepperbox Hill and Dean Hill.

See also[edit]

List of geological folds in Great Britain

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Salisbury (Map). 1:50000. British Geological Survey England and Wales. British Geological Survey. 2005. ISBN 0-7518-3425-4. 
  2. ^ a b Winchester (Map). 1:50000. British Geological Survey England and Wales. British Geological Survey. 2002. ISBN 0-7518-3340-1. 
  3. ^ Melville, R.V. (1982). Hampshire Basin and adjoining areas. British Regional Geology (4 ed.). British Geological Survey. ISBN 0852726503.