Dinitia Smith

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Dinita Smith
DinitiaSmith-hed-6.jpg
Born Cumberland, Maryland
Occupation Author
Nationality United States

Dinitia Smith (born December 26, 1945) is an American author and filmmaker. She was previously a culture reporter for The New York Times.

Biography[edit]

Dinitia Smith was born in Cumberland, Maryland, and raised primarily in Great Britain, where her father was a journalist. She came to the United States in 1959, and lived in New York City and Westchester. After graduating from Smith College,[1] she worked as a reporter for the Associated Press in New York.[2] She enrolled in the New York University Film School, and in 1971 obtained a Masters of Fine Arts. That year, she wrote and directed her first film, Passing Quietly Through, under her then-married name McCarthy.[3] That film was one of the first films by a woman to be chosen for the New York Film Festival. Smith continued to make documentaries, including some with American documentary filmmaker, David Grubin,[4] and also wrote several screenplays.[5] Her films have been shown at the Whitney Museum and the Museum of Modern Art.[6]

In 1975, Smith won an Emmy Award for a film she made for WNBC – TV.[7] She published her first novel, The Hard Rain, in 1980. Her second novel, Remember This, won her fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts[8] and the Ingram Merrill Foundation.[9] Her short fiction has been published in numerous literary journals.[10][11]

Smith was also a contributing editor at New York magazine;[12] from 1995 to 2006 she worked for The New York Times, where she wrote about arts and intellectual trends and ideas.[13] Her third novel, The Illusionist, published in 1997, was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year.[14] The Honeymoon, her biographical novel about the 19th century writer George Eliot, was published in 2016. The New York Times wrote that "Smith's enchanting account humanizes a figure renowned as much for her refutation of conventional female stereotypes and social limitations as for her genius for story and language".[15] A reviewer for the Washington Post called the book "the perfect example of when fictional storytelling about an eminent person is warranted".[16]

Smith has taught at Columbia University and the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference.[17]

Personal life[edit]

Smith is married to David Nasaw,[18] an author and historian, and the Arthur M. Schlesinger Professor at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. She has twin sons: Peter Caleb Nasaw (b. 1980), a social worker,[19] and Daniel Nasaw, an editor at The Wall Street Journal.[20][21][22]

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Smith College: NewsSmith". www.smith.edu. Retrieved 2015-10-30. 
  2. ^ "The Daily Mail, Hagerstown, MD". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 21 May 2015. 
  3. ^ "Passing-Quietly-Through - Trailer - Cast - Showtimes - NYTimes.com". www.nytimes.com. Retrieved 2015-10-30. 
  4. ^ "Somerset Daily American". Retrieved 6 Nov 2015. 
  5. ^ McAllister, Gwyn. "Homosexual witch hunt the subject of a new play". Martha's Vineyard Times. Retrieved 2015-10-30. 
  6. ^ "Art Workshop International". Archived from the original on 2016-08-22. Retrieved 6 Nov 2015. 
  7. ^ "18th Annual New York Emmy Awards Winners". New York Emmy Awards. Retrieved 21 May 2015. 
  8. ^ "Dinitia Smith". National Endowment for the Arts. Retrieved 21 May 2015. 
  9. ^ "Dinitia Smith". Creative Writing Program. Retrieved 7 May 2015. 
  10. ^ "Magic". www.hudsonreview.com. Retrieved 6 Nov 2015. 
  11. ^ "Valentine's Day". www.nereview.com. Retrieved 6 Nov 2015. 
  12. ^ "Dinitia Smith, "The Puritans"". New York Magazine. Retrieved 21 May 2015. 
  13. ^ "Dinita Smith Leaves Full-Time Post at NYT". GalleyCat. Retrieved 7 May 2015. 
  14. ^ "Notable Books of the Year 1997". www.nytimes.com. Retrieved 30 June 2015. 
  15. ^ Christensen, Lauren (2016-06-17). "Writers' Lives Reimagined". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2017-04-13. 
  16. ^ Rioux, Anne Boyd; Rioux, Anne Boyd (2016-05-05). "George Eliot's brief marriage got off to a really, really bad start". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2017-04-13. 
  17. ^ "Faculty Details: Dinitia Smtih". Art Workshop International. Archived from the original on 23 December 2008. Retrieved 30 June 2015. 
  18. ^ "Layla Moughari, Daniel Nasaw". The New York Times. 2014-08-31. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2015-11-06. 
  19. ^ "NASAW PETER CALEB - NY - Social Worker Lookup". www.socialworkerlookup.com. Retrieved 2016-02-02. 
  20. ^ "Nasaw, David 1945- - Contemporary Authors, New Revision Series | HighBeam Research". www.highbeam.com. Retrieved 2016-01-22. 
  21. ^ "Layla Moughari, Daniel Nasaw". The New York Times. 2014-08-31. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2017-04-13. 
  22. ^ "Daniel Nasaw - News, Articles, Biography, Photos - WSJ.com". WSJ. Retrieved 2017-04-13.