Document (TV series)

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Document
Genre documentary
Country of origin Canada
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 7
Production
Executive producer(s) Patrick Watson
Douglas Leiterman
Richard Nielsen (1968-1969)
Release
Original network CBC Television
Original release 16 September 1962 – 27 May 1969

Document is a Canadian documentary television series which aired on CBC Television from 1962 to 1969.

Premise[edit]

Various documentaries were featured in this occasional series.[1]

Production[edit]

The first executive producers for this series were Patrick Watson and Douglas Leiterman. Their intention was to air a documentary approximately each month to provide a detailed treatment of a subject. By the second season of Document, Leiterman became executive producer on This Hour Has Seven Days and concentrated his work on that series. Watson became a host of Document at that time.[2] Richard Nielsen became executive producer during the final episodes.

Scheduling[edit]

This series appeared on occasional random days and times from 16 September 1962 to 27 May 1969. It was given a monthly schedule in 1965 as a mid-year replacement for This Hour Has Seven Days in its Sunday night time slot.

Episodes[edit]

Episodes of Document included:

  • 16 September 1962: "The Servant of All" (Beryl Fox and Douglas Leiterman producers)
  • 6 March 1963: "Joshua, a Nigerian Portrait" (Allan King producer)
  • 21 March 1963: "The Pull to the South"
  • 28 July 1963: "The Balance of Terror" (Fox, Leiterman)
  • 26 November 1963: "The Peacemakers" (King)
  • 15 December 1963: "The Quiet Takeover" (Leiterman), concerning computers
  • 25 March 1964: "The Chief" (Fox, Leiterman), about John Diefenbaker
  • 20 April 1964: "Bjorn's Inferno" (King), about poet Bjorn Halverson
  • 20 May 1964: "The Image Makers", about American and Canadian public relations
  • 13 December 1964: "The Single Woman and the Double Standard" (Fox)
  • 27 December 1964: "Richard and Lillian: Two Portraits"
  • 31 January 1965: rebroadcast of "The Chief"
  • 28 March 1965: "Strike: Man Against Computers" (Larry Zolf)
  • 7 November 1965: "At the Moment of Impact" (Jim Carney)
  • 5 December 1965: "The Mills of the Gods: Viet Nam" (Fox), on Vietnam war
  • 26 December 1965: "Joan Baez"
  • 23 January 1966: "A Sense of Captivity" (Ross McLean), regarding the Canadian prison system
  • 27 February 1966: "The Story of Sandy"
  • 24 April 1966: "How To Go Out Of Your Mind", regarding the Millbrook experiments involving LSD
  • 22 September 1968: "No Balm in Gilead"
  • 17 November 1968: "Resurrection City" (Robert Hoyt director), regarding the Poor People's Campaign
  • 23 February 1969: "Occupation"
  • 13 April 1969: "Violence" (James Shaw, John David Hamilton)
  • 27 May 1969: "If I Don't Agree, Must I Go Away?" (Peter Pearson)

Reception[edit]

The Toronto Telegram's Chester Bloom expressed criticism of bias over the broadcast of "The Servant of All" episode of 16 September 1962. Bloom's politics sided with the Progressive Conservative party.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Corcelli, John (April 2002). "Document". Canadian Communications Foundation. Retrieved 7 May 2010. 
  2. ^ Rutherford, Paul (1990). When Television Was Young: Primetime Canada 1952-1967. University of Toronto Press. pp. 408–409. ISBN 0-8020-5830-2. 
  3. ^ Rutherford, Paul (1990). When Television Was Young: Primetime Canada 1952-1967. University of Toronto Press. p. 428. ISBN 0-8020-5830-2. 

External links[edit]