Riga Cathedral pipe organ

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Picture postcard view of the pipe organ from the early 20th century.

Dome Pipe Organ (Latvian: Doma ērģeles), the second largest pipe organ in Latvia, is located in Riga Cathedral. The largest mechanical pipe organ in Latvia is located in Liepāja Holy Trinity Cathedral.[1]

History[edit]

The first known Riga Cathedral organ was the largest in the world, but it was lost in 1547 during a fire. In the 16th century, the Cathedral Church built a new organ, which sounded for 280 years. Jacob Raab made out of the damaged organ's remains a prospect in mannerism style with some baroque elements complemented latter by other masters. Today the vocal organ is more than a century old; it is built by the German firm E.F. Walcker & Sons in Ludwigsburg in 1882-83 and it was inaugurated on January 31, 1884.[2] In 1983 the organ was reconstructed by Flentrop Orgelbouw, so it retained its distinctive sound and look. During the reconstruction the organ was completely dismantled and then reassembled, the second console was restored and later added three stops. Currently[when?] the facade is under reconstruction; the original painting in blue and gold will be restored.

Specification[3][edit]

The instrument is playable from two consoles. Its main console is located at the upper gallery and has 4 manuals and a pedal. The second console is on the lower gallery and it duplicates the fourth manual of the main console. The organ has 124 stops, which sound from 6718 pipes arranged on 26 wind chests. The longest pipe is about 10 metres long, the shortest one is only 13 mm. Pipe diameters are from 50 cm to 4 mm. The materials used in the pipes include pine, fir, maple, oak, beech, and pear and different metal alloys. There are 116 voices, 144 ranks; 18 combinations and General Crescendo.[4]

I Manual C–f3
Principal 16′
Flauto major 16′
Viola di Gamba 16′
Octav 8′
Hohlflöte 8′
Viola di Gamba 8′
Doppelflöte 8′
Gemshorn 8′
Quintatön 8′
Bourdon 8′
Dulciana 8′
Quinte 51/3
Octav 4′
Gemshorn 4′
Gamba 4′
Hohlflöte 4′
Rohrflöte 4′
Terz 31/5
Quinte 22/3
Octav 2′
Superoctav 1′
Sesquialtera II
Cornet V 8′
Mixtur VI 4′
Scharff IV 11/3
Contrafagott 16′
Tuba mirabilis 8′
Trompette harmonique 8′
Cor anglais 8′
Euphon 8′
Clairon 4′
Cornettino 2′
II Manual C–f3
Geigenprincipal 16′
Bourdon 16′
Principal 8′
Fugara 8′
Spitzflöte 8′
Rohrflöte 8′
Concertflöte 8′
Liebl. Gedeckt 8′
Viola di Alta 8′
Dolce 8′
Principal 4′
Fugara 4′
Salicet 4′
Flauto dolce 4′
Quinte 22/3
Superoctav 2′
Waldflöte 2′
Terz 13/5
Sesquialtera II
Cornet V 8′
Mixtur V 22/3
Äolodicon 16′
Ophicleide 8′
Fagott/Oboe 8′
Oboe 4′
Tremolo Fagott/Oboe
III Manual C–f3
Salicional 16′
Lieblich Gedeckt 16′
Geigenprincipal 8′
Viola d’amour 8′
Wienerflöte 8′
Gedeckt 8′
Salicional 8′
Harmonika 8′
Bourdon d’echo 8′
Bifra 8′+4′
Geigenprincipal 4′
Spitzflöte 4′
Traversflöte 4′
Dolce 4′
Piccolo 2′
Mixtur IV 22/3
Vox humana 8′
Tremolo Vox humana


IV Schwellwerk C–f3
Quintatön 16′
Flötenprincipal 8′
Unda maris 8′
Melodica 8′
Flûte d'Amour 8′
Bourdon doux 8′
Äoline 8′
Voix céleste 8′
Viola tremolo 8′
Piffaro 8′+2′
Flötenprincipal 4′
Gedecktflöte 4′
Vox angelica 4′
Salicet 2′
Harmonia ätheria III 22/3
Trompete 8′
Physharmonika 8′
Pedal C–d1
Principalbaß 32′
Offenbaß 16′
Violonbaß 16′
Contraviolonbaß 16′
Subbaß 16′
Flötenbaß 16′
Gedecktbaß 16′
Quintbaß 102/3
Octavbaß 8′
Hohlflötenbaß 8′
Gedecktbaß 8′
Violoncello 8′
Terzbaß 62/5
Octavbaß 4′
Hohlflöte 4′
Octav 2′
Sesquialtera II
Mixtur V 51/3
Grand Bourdon V 32′
Bombardon 32′
Posaune 16′
Trompete 8′
Corno 4′


Schwellpedal C–d1
Violon 16′
Bourdon 16′
Dolceflöte 8′
Violon 8′
Viola 4′
Flautino 2′
Serpent 16′
Bassethorn 8′
  • Couplers: II/I, III/I, IV/I, III/II, IV/II, I/P, II/P, III/P, IV/P, I–IV/P, P/I („noli me tangere“).

References[edit]

  1. ^ www.trinitatis.lv
  2. ^ Gerhard Walcker-Mayer The Organ in Riga Cathedral as viewed by the Walcker firm March 2003
  3. ^ "Rīgas Doms - Ērģeles". www.doms.lv. Retrieved 2017-05-03. 
  4. ^ Magle, Frederik. "The Walcker Organ in Riga Cathedral". http://www.magle.dk/music-forums/801-walcker-organ-riga-cathedral.html. Retrieved on 2007-07-11