Don Conroy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Don Conroy
Nationality Irish
Other names "Uncle Don", " The Don"
Education Life drawings and culture at the National College of Art and Design
Occupation Artist
Known for Preserving wildlife, his slots on The Den during which he would teach the children of Ireland how to draw
Term 27 years
Children five
Website http://donconroy.com/

Don Conroy is an Irish artist, environmentalist, television personality and writer of children's literature. His artistic and literary work focuses on natural themes, including wildlife.

He works for wildlife conservation in Ireland and made regular appearances on The Den since it began in 1986, becoming the longest continually serving member of the cast. He has also appeared publicly at libraries, schools and elsewhere, where he entertains children with stories and drawings of various animals, in much the same capacity as his role on The Den.

His favourite animal is the barn owl.

Biography[edit]

Conroy studied life drawings and culture at the National College of Art and Design and then worked as designer and illustrator for advertising agencies as well as in the theatre. He played an important part in the highly successful project to reintroduce the golden eagle to Ireland, as well as establishing a sanctuary for whales and dolphins in Irish waters (the first of its kind in Europe). One of his favourite creatures to draw is the barn owl; it has inspired him to write a poem and he has drawn it many times over the years—it was also the subject of his drawing at a Vicar Street reunion of The Den held by Today FM's The Ray D'Arcy Show on 14 November 2008.

His greatest literary works include the Wings trilogy: On Silent Wings, Wild Wings and Sky Wings. Other titles include Vampire Journal, Vampire of St. Michan's and The Celestial Child.[1] For younger readers his titles include What the Owl Saw, The Fox's Tale, Joey's Big Day, The Bookworm Who Turned Over a New Leaf, Seal of Approval, and Elephant at the Door.[2][3] It gives him great satisfaction to draw Barn Owls and to write about them too.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ages 8-12". Don Conroy. Archived from the original on 9 April 2015. 
  2. ^ "Ages 4-7". Don Conroy. Archived from the original on 9 April 2015. 
  3. ^ "Ages 6-9". Don Conroy. Archived from the original on 9 April 2015. 

External links[edit]