Doumeira Islands

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Doumeira Islands
Disputed island
Ras Doumeira.png
Map of the disputed Ras Doumeira region showing the currently-in-force 1900 boundary agreement
Geography
LocationRed Sea
Coordinates12°42′56″N 43°08′53″E / 12.715465°N 43.148044°E / 12.715465; 43.148044
Total islands2
Major islandsDoumeira, Kallida
Area1.29 square kilometres (0.50 sq mi)
Highest point
  • 44 metres (144 ft)
Administered by
 Djibouti
Claimed by
 Eritrea
 Djibouti
Demographics
PopulationUninhabited

The Doumeira Islands are situated northeast of Djibouti and east of Eritrea near the Bab el-Mandeb in the Red Sea. They consist of Doumeira, located less than one kilometer off of the Eritrean and Djiboutian shore, and the much smaller island of Kallîda, which is 250 meters to the east.

History[edit]

The currently-in-force 1900 boundary agreement specifies that the international boundary starts at Cape Doumeira (Ras Doumeira) at the Red Sea and runs for 1.5 km along the watershed divide of the peninsula. Furthermore, the 1900 protocol specified that Ile Doumeira (Doumeira Island) immediately offshore and its adjacent smaller islets would not be assigned sovereignty and would remain demilitarized.[1]

In January 1935, Italy and France signed the Franco-Italian Agreement wherein parts of French Somaliland (Djibouti) were given to Italy (Eritrea).[2] However, the question of ratification has brought this agreement, and its provision of substantial parts of Djibouti to Eritrea, into question.[3][4] In April 1996 the two countries almost went to war after a Djibouti official accused Eritrea of shelling Ras Doumeira.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "International Boundary Studies for most of the world". Archived from the original on 2008-09-24. Retrieved 2008-11-24.
  2. ^ Langer, William L. (1948). An Encyclopaedia of World History. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company. p. 990.
  3. ^ "Djibouti-Eritrea boundary row re-emerges". 2008-04-28. Retrieved 2009-08-21.
  4. ^ "The Eritrea-Djibouti border dispute" (PDF). Institute for Security Studies. 2008-09-15. Retrieved 2014-07-14.