Duncan Norton-Taylor

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Duncan Norton-Taylor
Born1904
DiedSeptember 13, 1982
ResidenceOxford, Maryland, US
EducationBrown University
Occupationjournalist, editor
Years active1939–1965
EmployerTime, Fortune
Spouse(s)Margaret Scott
Children3

Duncan Norton-Taylor was an American journalist who was a senior editor at Time magazine and managing editor at Fortune magazine from the 1940s through the 1960s.[1]

Background[edit]

Norton-Taylor graduated Brown University, where he worked at The Brown Jug.

Career[edit]

Upon graduating, Norton-Taylor began work as a newspaper reporter.[1]

He joined Time as a writer in 1939, the same year as his long-time colleague and friend, Whittaker Chambers. In 1940, William Saroyan lists him among "contributing editors" at Time in the play, Love's Old Sweet Song.[2] Norton-Taylor and Chambers both rose to become senior editors.[1]

In 1951, Norton-Taylor became an editor at Fortune. In 1959, he became Fortunes managing editor.[1] In 1965, he stepped down and joined Fortunes board of editors.[1]

In 2012, Fortune republished an article by Norton-Taylor called "How Top Executives Live" from 1955.[3]

Personal[edit]

Norton-Taylor married Margaret Scott. They had three daughters: Susan Norton-Taylor May, Nancy Norton-Taylor Tomson, and Joan Norton-Taylor. He lived in Oxford, Maryland in retirement from 1967 onwards.[1] He died on Monday, September 13, 1982, at Memorial Hospital in nearby Easton, Maryland, after a stroke, aged 78. Surviving him were his wife, daughters, and nine grandchildren.[1]

(His great-grandson, Scott Laudati,[4] is the author of "Hawaiian Shirts In The Electric Chair",[5] a book of poetry published in 2014 by Kuboa Press.)

Works[edit]

Norton-Taylor wrote and edited more than half a dozen books.

Books written[edit]

  • With My Heart in My Mouth (1944)[6]
  • I Went to See for Myself (1945)[7]
  • God's Man: A Novel on the Life of John Calvin (1979)[8]

Books edited[edit]

  • Cold Friday by Whittaker Chambers, edited and with an introduction by Duncan Norton-Taylor (1964)[9][10]
  • The Celts, Duncan Norton-Taylor and the editors of Time-Life Books (1974)[11]
  • For Some, the Dream Came True: The Best from 50 years of Fortune Magazine, selected and edited by Duncan Norton-Taylor (1981)[12]

Adaptations[edit]

  • Beautiful but Young: A Contest Selection by Olive White Fortenbacher, arranged from Duncan Norton-Taylor's story of the same name (1932)[13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Duncan Norton-Taylor Dies; A Retired Editor of Fortune". New York Times. 18 September 1982.
  2. ^ Saroyan, William (1940). Love's Old Sweet Song: A Play in Three Acts. Samuel French. p. 72. Retrieved 15 July 2017.
  3. ^ Norton-Taylor, Duncan (1955). "How Top Executives Live". Retrieved 3 February 2013.
  4. ^ Medium. https://medium.com/@scottlaudati
  5. ^ Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/Hawaiian-Shirts-Electric-Chair-Laudati/dp/0692338519/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1430471934&sr=8-1&keywords=scott+laudati
  6. ^ "With My Heart in My Mouth". Library of Congress. Retrieved 3 February 2013.
  7. ^ "I Went to See for Myself". Library of Congress. Retrieved 3 February 2013.
  8. ^ "God's Man: A Novel on the Life of John Calvin". Library of Congress. Retrieved 3 February 2013.
  9. ^ Chambers, Whittaker (1964). Cold Friday. Random House. p. 128. ISBN 0-394-41969-3.
  10. ^ "Cold Friday". Library of Congress. Retrieved 3 February 2013.
  11. ^ "The Celts". Library of Congress. Retrieved 3 February 2013.
  12. ^ "For Some, the Dream Came True: The Best from 50 years of Fortune Magazine". Library of Congress. Retrieved 3 February 2013.
  13. ^ "Beautiful but young, a contest selection, arranged from Duncan..." Library of Congress. Retrieved 3 February 2013.