Edward Dalton Shea

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Hon. Sir Edward Dalton Shea (June 29, 1820 – January 8, 1913) was a journalist and political figure in Newfoundland. He represented Ferryland in the Newfoundland and Labrador House of Assembly from 1855 to 1865 as a Liberal and then Conservative member.

Career[edit]

He was born in St. John's, the son of Henry Shea, an Irish-born merchant, and Eleanor Ryan. After completing his education, in 1836, he entered work in his father's business. In 1846, Shea became editor and publisher for The Newfoundlander, which had been previously edited by his brothers William Richard and Ambrose. He married Gertrude Corbett in 1849. Shea and his brother Ambrose became Conservatives in 1865 and he was named financial secretary for Newfoundland. In 1866, he was named to the Legislative Council of Newfoundland. Shea ran unsuccessfully for reelection to the assembly in 1873. In 1874, he was named colonial secretary. In 1886, he was named president of the Legislative Council, serving until 1912, and cashier for the Newfoundland Savings Bank, retaining that position until 1905. Shea was made a knight bachelor on 14 August 1902,[1] after the honour had been announced in the 1902 Coronation Honours list published on 26 June 1902.[2]

He died in St. John's at the age of 92 in 1913.

Family[edit]

His son George Shea also served in the Newfoundland assembly.

His daughter Emily Shea, who was born and educated in Newfoundland, married, 1881, Captain Henry Moore Jackson, R.A., a son of the Bishop of Antigua. Emily's husband was created a C.M.G. in 1892, a K.C.M.G. in 1899, became Governor of the Leeward Islands in 1901, and Governor of Fiji and High Commissioner for the Western Pacific in 1902.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "No. 27465". The London Gazette. 15 August 1902. p. 5327. 
  2. ^ "The Coronation Honours". The Times (36804). London. 26 June 1902. p. 5. 
  3. ^ Morgan, Henry James Types of Canadian women and of women who are or have been connected with Canada : (Toronto, 1903) [1]