Edward Shuter

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Edward Shuter as Justice Woodcock in "Love in a Village" by Isaac Bickerstaffe (Johann Zoffany, 1767)

Edward Shuter (c. 1728–1776) was an English actor.

Life[edit]

Shuter was born in London to poor parents. He made his first appearance on the London stage in 1745 in Cibber's Schoolboy. [1]

He made a great reputation in old men's parts. He was the original Justice Woodcock in Love in a Village (1762), Hardcastle in She Stoops to Conquer (1773), and Sir Anthony Absolute in The Rivals (1775).

He was buried in St. Paul's, Covent Garden.[2]

Portraits[edit]

His portrait as Scapin is in the Mathews collection in the Garrick Club; another portrait by Zoffany was engraved by Finlayson.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chisholm 1911.
  2. ^ Knight 1897.
  3. ^  Knight, John Joseph (1897). "Shuter, Edward". In Lee, Sidney. Dictionary of National Biography. 52. London: Smith, Elder & Co. pp. 172–174. 
Attribution
  •  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Shuter, Edward". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. 
  •  Knight, John Joseph (1897). "Shuter, Edward". In Lee, Sidney. Dictionary of National Biography. 52. London: Smith, Elder & Co. pp. 172–174. ; Endnotes:
    • Genest's Account of the English Stage
    • Doran's Annals of the Stage, ed. Lowe
    • Davies's Dramatick Miscellanies
    • Clark Russell's Representative Actors
    • Dibdin's History of the Stage
    • Boaden's Memoirs of Mrs. Siddons, and Life of Mrs. Jordan
    • O'Keeffe's Recollections
    • Garrick Correspondence
    • Dramatic Mirror
    • Thespian Dict.
    • Georgian Era
    • The Dramatic History of Master Edward, Miss Ann, Mr. Llwhuddwhydd, and others, the extraordinaries of these times. Collected from Zaphaniel's original papers, illustrated with copper-plates, London, 1743 [should be 1763], 12mo, a scarce work by G. A. Stevens, in imitation of Sterne's style, was aimed particularly at Shuter and Nancy Dawson; it was several times reprinted (Brit. Mus. Cat. 1785 and 1786).

External links[edit]