Egg Island (Bahamas)

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Egg Island Lighthouse
Egg Island (Bahamas) is located in Bahamas
Egg Island (Bahamas)
Bahamas
Location Egg Island
Eleuthera
Bahamas
Coordinates 25°29′59.9″N 76°52′46.8″W / 25.499972°N 76.879667°W / 25.499972; -76.879667
Year first constructed 1891 (first)
Year first lit n/a
Foundation concrete basement
Construction metal skeletal tower
Tower shape square pyramidal tower with light
Markings / pattern white tower
Height 18 metres (59 ft)
Focal height 34 metres (112 ft)
Light source solar power
Range 12 nautical miles (22 km; 14 mi)
Characteristic Fl W 3s.
Admiralty number J4678
NGA number 12200
ARLHS number BAH-006[1][2]

Egg Island is an uninhabited island, officially an islet, comprising 800 m2 (8,611 sq ft) in the Bahamas. It's so named because it is home to chickens owned by residents of other nearby islands who travel here to collect the eggs.

The island has a crescent shaped beach that is protected by a reef that protects the entire beach. The water behind the reef is generally less than 2 metres (6 ft 7 in) deep making it a good place to swim or watch the sea life. Since the water is so shallow and well protected, it tends to be warmer than the surrounding sea.

Egg Island gained some fame in the 1980s when Arne Molander claimed that this was the first island where Columbus landed in his 1492 voyage to the New World.[3][4][5]

Off the island is the wreck of the Arimoroa.[6][7]

Recently, Egg Island has gained international recognition after Disney Cruise Lines started exploring the area for possible development of a cruise ship port. This project would have entailed dredging the sea bed to make way for a cruise ship port, drilling into and destroying coral reefs. Residents of nearby Spanish Wells and north Eleuthera were extremely concerned at the implications and started a petition to have the sale of Egg Island to Disney halted. The primary concern is that Egg Island is a natural nursery for sea turtles, juvenile fish including snapper and grouper, crawfish (lobster), conch, stingrays, sea birds and other wild sealife, and any disturbance to the delicate eco-system would prove fatal to these animals and by default, detrimental to the local fishing industry. After the petition was signed by thousands and much agitation, Disney announced that due to the environmental impact, they would not proceed with the project. Joseph Darville spoke on behalf of local environmental organisation Save the Bays and Waterkeepers Bahamas, stating in a public release, "“The corporate entity, Disney Cruise Lines, demonstrated responsibility and made the right choice. The community got together and spoke in a voice that could not be ignored about an activity that would have changed their way of life and could have destroyed much of the fish population on which they depend for their livelihood because the reefs and the mangroves around Egg Island are important fish, conch and crawfish nurseries and habitats. And the environmental impact assessment did what it was created for. Based on science, not emotion, it showed that there would have been damage and destruction of the marine environment.”

A comment on the Disney blog placed the blame for the situation on the Bahamian government, stating that "If Bahamians want to protect their lands they should focus efforts on their own government. Disney and any other cruise line that is looking for land to develop in the Bahamas is only doing so because the government will allow them to lease and develop the land. I realize making Mickey the villain helps exposure, but as long as the government is OK with plans and the cruise lines are comfortable with the environmental impact or put plans in place to offset the impact then it the practice will continue. That’s just my opinion. Disney may have inquired, but they certainly did not show up on Egg Island uninvited. Insert any cruise line in this scenario if you will, it doesn’t make a difference. The fact remains, government officials allowed Disney to evaluate the potential of Egg Island as a cruise destination." [8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Egg Island The Lighthouse Directory. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved 23 August 2016
  2. ^ Egg Island light Lighthouse Explorer. Retrieved 23 August 2016
  3. ^ "Cruising Guide to the Abacos and the Northern Bahamas". Archived from the original on 2008-02-06. Retrieved 2008-02-12. 
  4. ^ "Journal of the Bahamas Historical Society, Volume 14 (October 1992)". Retrieved 2008-02-12. 
  5. ^ Molander, Arne (2012) "The Horizons of Christopher Columbus: Using the Heavens to Map America". Lulu.com. ISBN 978-1-105-86335-6
  6. ^ "Experimental Evidence of Nutrient Pollution: The Wreck of the Arimora, Egg Island, Bahamas" (pdf). Retrieved 2008-02-12. 
  7. ^ "YouTube Video Scuba Diving on the Arimoroa Wreck". 
  8. ^ "Disney Cruise Line No Longer Considering Egg Island for Development Following Impact Studies posted on July 22, 2016 by Scott Sanders". Retrieved 2016-07-22. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 25°29′N 76°53′W / 25.483°N 76.883°W / 25.483; -76.883