Elaine Hugh-Jones

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Elaine Hugh-Jones (born 14 June 1927) is a Welsh pianist, music educator and composer. She was born in London and studied piano with Harold Craxton, Julian Isserlis and with Lennox Berkeley. After completing her studies, she took a position as an accompanist with the BBC where she worked for 37 years. She also taught music at Malvern Girls' College.[1][2]

Works[edit]

Selected works include:

  • A back view (in Eight Cornford Songs) (Text: Frances Cornford)
  • Bicker's Cottage (in Eight Cornford Songs) (Text: Frances Cornford)
  • Echo (in Six de la Mare Songs) (Text: Walter de la Mare)
  • Ghosts (in Six de la Mare Songs) (Text: Walter de la Mare)
  • Night song (in Eight Cornford Songs) (Text: Frances Cornford)
  • Silver (in Six de la Mare Songs) (Text: Walter de la Mare)
  • The hare (in Six de la Mare Songs) (Text: Walter de la Mare)
  • The madman and the child (in Eight Cornford Songs) (Text: Frances Cornford)
  • The old woman at the flower show (in Eight Cornford Songs) (Text: Frances Cornford)
  • The ride‑by‑nights (in Six de la Mare Songs) (Text: Walter de la Mare)
  • The road to Coursegoules (in Eight Cornford Songs) (Text: Frances Cornford)
  • The watch (in Eight Cornford Songs) (Text: Frances Cornford)
  • To a young cat in the orchard (in Eight Cornford Songs) (Text: Frances Cornford)
  • Winter (in Six de la Mare Songs) (Text: Walter de la Mare)[3]

Hugh-Jones' songs were broadcast on BBC Radio 3 and have been recorded and released on CD, including:

  • Poésie et musique au féminin (The Feminine in Poetry and Music) Audio CD (9 April 2002) Gallo, ASIN: B000063COE
  • In Flanders Fields Audio CD (9 May 2006) Quartz, ASIN: B000E1P33Y

She has also been featured in British Music: Some Views of Richard Arnell; Bantock & Newman; Holst, Purcell & Morley College; Elaine Hugh - Jones; Tobias Matthay; Music in Birmingham: v. 29 by Paul Jackson and Roger Carpenter (Paperback - 31 Oct 2007) British Music Society, ISBN 978-1-870536-29-5

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Elaine Hugh-Jones". Retrieved 21 December 2010. 
  2. ^ Sadie, Julie Anne; Samuel, Rhian (1994). The Norton/Grove dictionary of women composers (Digitized online by GoogleBooks). Retrieved 4 October 2010. 
  3. ^ "Composer: Elaine Hugh-Jones (1927-)". Retrieved 21 December 2010. [permanent dead link]