Elisabeth Luther Cary

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Elisabeth Luther Cary (May 18, 1867 – July 13, 1936) was an American writer and art critic.

The Rossettis by Elisabeth Luther Cary

Life[edit]

Born in Brooklyn, New York, she was the daughter of Edward and Elisabeth (Luther) Cary. Her father was editor of the Brooklyn Union and later became a New York Times editorial writer.[1] Elisabeth was privately educated and from 1885–1898 she studied art. From 1893–1895, she translated three novels from French.[2] In the years that followed she published a series of studies on prominent literary figures. In 1904, she collaborated with Annie M. Jones to produce a book of recipes inspired by quotes from famous literary figures titled, Books and My Food.[3] She began publishing a monthly small art magazine called The Scrip in 1905.[4]

In 1908, she was named the first full-time art critic for the New York Times,[5] where she worked for the next twenty five years.[6] Following World War I, she helped encourage the founding of industrial arts schools and the introduction of machinery into the studio.[7] After living in Brooklyn her entire life, she died of heat exhaustion in 1936. She was buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Brooklyn.[6]

Bibliography[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Funeral of Edward Cary.; Service for Times Editorial Writer Attended by Many Who Had Admired and Loved Him". The New York Times. May 26, 1917. 
  2. ^ Hamersly, Lewis Randolph (1907). Frank R. Holmes, ed. Who's who in New York City and State. L.R. Hamersly Co. p. 255. 
  3. ^ Schoonover, David. "Books and My Food". Iowa Szathmáry Culinary Arts Series. University of Iowa Press. Retrieved 2011-06-23. 
  4. ^ Leonard, John William (1914). Woman's who's who of America: a biographical dictionary of contemporary women of the United States and Canada, 1914-1915. American Commonwealth Co. p. 166. ISBN 0-8103-4018-6. 
  5. ^ Olsen, Kirstin (1994). Chronology of women's history. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 184. ISBN 0-313-28803-8. 
  6. ^ a b James, Edward T.; James, Janet Wilson (1974). Paul S. Boyer, eds. Notable american women: a biographical dictionary. Dumbarton Oaks Colloquium Series in the History of Landscape Architecture. Harvard University Press. p. 298. ISBN 0-674-62734-2. 
  7. ^ Marquardt, Virginia Hagelstein (Spring 1988). "Louis Lozowick: From "Machine Ornaments" to Applied Design, 1923–1930". The Journal of Decorative and Propaganda Arts. 8: 40–57. JSTOR 1503969. 

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