Elisha Standiford

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Elisha Standiford
A man, balding on top with dark hair in the back and a gray beard, wearing a black jacket and white shirt
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Kentucky's 5th district
In office
March 4, 1873 – March 3, 1875
Preceded by Boyd Winchester
Succeeded by Edward Y. Parsons
Member of the Kentucky Senate
In office
1868
1871
Personal details
Born (1831-12-28)December 28, 1831
Louisville, Kentucky
Died July 26, 1887(1887-07-26) (aged 55)
Louisville, Kentucky
Nationality American
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Mary A. E. Neill (?-1875)
Lorena Scott
Alma mater Kentucky School of Medicine
Signature E. D. Standiford

Elisha David Standiford (December 28, 1831 – July 26, 1887) was a United States Representative from Kentucky. He was born near Louisville, Kentucky. He attended the common schools and St. Mary's College, near Lebanon, Kentucky. He graduated from the Kentucky School of Medicine and commenced practice in Louisville, Kentucky. Later, he abandoned the practice of medicine and engaged in agricultural pursuits and other enterprises.

Standiford was a member of the Kentucky Senate in 1868 and 1871. He was elected as a Democrat to the Forty-third Congress (March 4, 1873 – March 3, 1875) but declined a renomination in 1874 to the Forty-fourth Congress. After leaving Congress, he was president of the Louisville & Nashville Railroad Company from 1875 to 1879. In addition, he engaged in banking and agricultural pursuits. He died in Louisville, Kentucky in 1887 and was buried in Cave Hill Cemetery.

Louisville's largest airport was originally named Standiford Field before being changed to Louisville International Airport in 1995. The airport today still retains the airport code of SDF.

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U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Boyd Winchester
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Kentucky's 5th congressional district

March 4, 1873 – March 3, 1875
Succeeded by
Edward Y. Parsons