Erica Basnicki

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Erica Basnicki
Born1980 (age 40–41)
Occupationwriter
LanguageEnglish
NationalityCanada

Erica Basnicki is a Canadian writer who first rose to prominence because her opinions were sought because she was a vocal surviving relative of a victim of al Qaeda's 2001 attack on the World Trade Center.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7]

In 1998, while still a high school student at Richview Collegiate Institute, Basnicki wrote an article for the Toronto Star about an upcoming teacher's strike.[8]

Basnicki was chosen to read the names of the 24 Canadians who died on September 11, 2001, during a memorial ceremony on September 11, 2002.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Erica Basnicki (2010-08-06). "9/11 victim's daughter slams terror play". Toronto Sun.
  2. ^ Brenda Craig (2002-08-06). "Victims' families still grieving". CTV News. Archived from the original on 2010-06-04. Ken Basnicki's stepdaughter, Erica, was back home in Toronto. A journalism student, she woke up to the radio, and realized the newscasters were sounding unusually somber. She knew her dad had gone to New York on business trip, and by the time she turned on the television, she knew he was in trouble.
  3. ^ "Kenneth Basnicki:Still an Inspiration". The New York Times. 2002-06-16. Now she hopes to study journalism in New York City. 'The best way to honor my dad for me is to not be scared, and to live and go to school in New York,' she said. 'I know my dad's fighting for me somehow. He'll work his magic, and I'll work my magic over here.'
  4. ^ Howell Raines, Janny Scott (2003). Portraits 9/11/01: the collected "Portraits of grief" from The New York Times. The New York Times. ISBN 978-0-8050-7360-7.
  5. ^ Tamra Orr (2003). Egyptian Islamic Jihad. The Rosen Publishing Group. p. 6. ISBN 978-0-8239-3819-3. Erica Basnicki.
  6. ^ Margaret Wente (2002-09-11). CTV News https://web.archive.org/web/20100207023606/http://www.ctv.ca/special/sept11/hubs/comment/wente01.html. Archived from the original on 2010-02-07. 'Our humour is dark sometimes,' says Erica Basnicki. 'But if life doesn't go on, the terrorists have won.' Missing or empty |title= (help)
  7. ^ a b Sheila Nykwist (2002-09-11). "Healing in the limelight". Eyeopener Online. Archived from the original on 2009-09-14. A year after the tragic event that took the life of her father, Erica Basnicki remains in the limelight. Many call her the unofficial spokesperson for Canadian victims of last September's terrorist attacks in the United States.
  8. ^ Erica Basnicki (1998-09-06). "How will strike improve system for students?". Toronto Star.