Erin Arvedlund

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Erin E. Arvedlund is a financial journalist who has written for Barron's, The Wall Street Journal, the Moscow Times, The New York Times, TheStreet.com, and Portfolio.com. On Feb. 1, 2011, her "Your Money" column debuted in The Philadelphia Inquirer.

On May 7, 2001, Barron's published her article "Don't Ask, Don't Tell: Bernie Madoff Attracts Skeptics in 2001".[1] This was only the second investigative article, following closely on Michael Ocrant’s May 1, 2001 article in industry publication MARHedge, to question Bernard Madoff's scheme, his demand for investor secrecy and his "enviably steady gains".

When the SEC finally investigated Madoff, after the December 2008 failure of his multi-billion dollar scheme, its Exhibit 104 belatedly mentions the Ocrant and Arvedlund articles:

"Madoff said that when the MarHedge and Barron's [sic] articles came out, he expected the SEC to come to him, and that he was surprised the SEC didn't follow up with him. He also mentioned that Erin Arvedlund ("That idiot woman from Barron's.") didn't know what she was talking about, and that it was obvious she was not familiar with the industry."[2]

Arvedlund's father was a money manager in Wilmington, Delaware, where she was raised. She graduated from Ursuline Academy in 1984 and Archmere Academy in 1988, both in Wilmington. She attended Tufts University before starting her career at Dow Jones News Service.[3][4] She lives in Philadelphia.

Arvedlund's first book, Too Good to be True: The Rise and Fall of Bernie Madoff, was published in August, 2009.[5] This was followed, in June, 2010, by The Club No One Wanted to Join - Madoff Victims in Their Own Words, which she edited from the stories told by Madoff's victims.[6] Arvedlund also wrote a book on the Libor scandal, Open Secret: The Global Banking Conspiracy That Swindled Investors Out of Billions, published in September, 2014, covering how the London Interbank Offered Rate (Libor), a primary benchmark for short-term interest rates around the world, had been manipulated by major banks across the world.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Arvedlund, Erin E. (2001-05-07). "Don't Ask, Don't Tell: Bernie Madoff Attracts Skeptics in 2001". Barron's. Retrieved 2018-08-30.
  2. ^ Interview of Bernard L. Madoff, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
  3. ^ DiStefano, Joseph (August 11, 2009). "PhillyDeals: Arvedlund was right: Madoff was too good to be true". Philadelphia Inquirer.
  4. ^ DiStefano, Joseph N. "Philly's Arvedlund blew whistle, throws book at Madoff". Philadelphia Inquirer. Philly.com. Retrieved 2 November 2015.
  5. ^ Arvedlund, Erin (2009). Too Good to Be True: The Rise and Fall of Bernie Madoff. Portfolio. ISBN 9781591842873.
  6. ^ Arvedlund, Erin, ed. (2010). The Club No One Wanted to Join - Madoff Victims in Their Own Words. Doukathsan Press. ISBN 9780982250938.
  7. ^ Arvedlund, Erin (2014). Open Secret: The Global Banking Conspiracy That Swindled Investors Out of Billions. Portfolio. ISBN 9781591846680.