Eucharis amazonica

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Eucharis amazonica
Eucharis amazonica - Berlin Botanical Garden - IMG 8702.JPG
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Monocots
Order: Asparagales
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Subfamily: Amaryllidoideae
Genus: Eucharis
Species: E. amazonica
Binomial name
Eucharis amazonica

Eucharis amazonica is a species of flowering plant in the family Amaryllidaceae, native to Peru. It is cultivated as an ornamental in many countries and naturalized in Venezuela, Mexico, the West Indies, Ascension Island, Sri Lanka, Fiji, the Solomon Islands and the Society Islands.[1][2] The English name Amazon lily is used for this species,[3] but is also used for the genus Eucharis as a whole (and for other genera).[4]

An evergreen bulbous perennial, Eucharis amazonica grows to 75 cm (30 in) tall by 50 cm (20 in) broad, with long dark leaves and umbels of fragrant white flowers. The stamens are fused into a single cup.[5][6][7]

In cultivation it is often confused with the hybrid Eucharis × grandiflora. It has gained the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit.[3][8]

Eucharis amazonica flowers and buds

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families
  2. ^ Encyclopedia of Life entry
  3. ^ a b "Eucharis amazonica|Amazon lily". RHS Gardening. Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 2015-02-03.
  4. ^ "Caliphruria tenera (Amazon lily)". Plants & Fungi at Kew. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Retrieved 2015-02-03.
  5. ^ Planchon, Jules Émile. 1857. Journal Général d'Horticulture 12: 69–70, f. 1216.
  6. ^ Alan W. Meerow and Bijan Dehgan, "Re-Establishment and Lectotypification of Eucharis amazonica Linden ex Planchon (Amaryllidaceae)", Taxon, Vol. 33, No. 3 (Aug., 1984), pp. 416-422.
  7. ^ J Van Bragt, W Luiten, PA Sprenkels, CJ Keijzer, "Flower formation in Eucharis amazonica Linden ex Planchon", Acta Hort. (ISHS) 177:157-164, 1986.
  8. ^ "AGM Plants - Ornamental" (PDF). Royal Horticultural Society. July 2017. p. 37. Retrieved 18 February 2018.

External links[edit]