Eve Aschheim

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Eve Aschheim (born 1958) is an American draftsperson and painter.

Life and career[edit]

A native of New York City, Aschheim lived in California and Singapore as a child.[1] She studied art at the University of California, Berkeley, where she received her BA in 1984, working primarily with artists Elmer Bischoff, Joan Brown and Chris Brown. In 1987 she received her MFA at the University of California, Davis, under the instruction of Wayne Thiebaud, Harvey Himelfarb, Squeak Carnwath, Mike Henderson, Manual Neri, and Robert Arneson. She began teaching as an adjunct lecturer in the Visual Arts Program at Princeton University in 1991[2] and she became full-time in 2001. From 2003-7 she served as director of the Visual Arts Program,[3] Aschheim's paintings and drawings are abstract and geometric.[4][2][5]

Aschheim is married to John Yau, with whom she has a child. They live in Manhattan.[3]

Exhibitions[edit]

Recent solo exhibitions of Aschheim's work include "Lines without Outlines", “T” Space, (Rhinebeck, NY, 2017 and Barbara Walters Gallery, Sarah Lawrence College 2018), Lori Bookstein Fine Art, NYC (2016), and Galerie Inga Kondeyne, Berlin (2015, with Hanns Schimansky). Solo museum exhibitions of her work include the Weatherspoon Art Museum, Greensboro, NC, the Bannister Gallery, Rhode Island College, the New York Studio School, and Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY. Aschheim has exhibited regularly in Europe at Galerie Rainer Borgemeister, Berlin, Galleri Magnus Aklundh, Malmo, Sweden, and Galerie Inga Kondeyne, Berlin.

Awards[edit]

During her career she has received fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Elizabeth Foundation, The Joan Mitchell Foundation, and the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, and she has been awarded the Purchase Award and the Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Award, both from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.[3] She received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2012.[1] In 2017 she was elected an Academician of the National Academy of Design.[6]

Collections[edit]

Three of her works, including one formerly owned by the Corcoran Gallery of Art, are in the collection of the National Gallery of Art,[7][8][9] while six are owned by the Museum of Modern Art.[10] Her work is also in the collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami.[11] Additional collections: Arkansas Art Center, Little Rock, AR; Boise Art Museum, Boise, ID; Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University; Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin, Germany; Colorado Springs Fine Art Center; The Hood Museum of Dartmouth College, NH; Kupferstichkabinett, Nationalgalerie, Berlin; Kunstmuseum Bonn, Germany; The Lannan Foundation, Santa Fe, New Mexico; The New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe, NM ; The New-York Historical Society; The Pierpont Morgan Museum and Library Contemporary Drawings Collection, New York City; The Pollock Gallery, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX; Princeton University Art Museum; University of Alaska, Museum of the North, Fairbanks, AK; University of New Mexico Art Museum, Albuquerque; University Museum of Contemporary Art, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; The San Diego Museum of Art; Yale University Art Museum

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "John Simon Guggenheim Foundation | Eve Aschheim". Retrieved May 16, 2019.
  2. ^ a b "Eve Aschheim". Lewis Center for the Arts. Retrieved May 16, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c "Eve Aschheim New Drawings (07-08)". www.skidmore.edu. Retrieved May 16, 2019.
  4. ^ "Eve Aschheim - Archive - Bookstein Projects". www.booksteinprojects.com. Retrieved May 16, 2019.
  5. ^ "Eve Aschheim". Lannan Foundation. Retrieved May 16, 2019.
  6. ^ "Visual Arts faculty member Eve Aschheim joins National Academy Class of 2017". Lewis Center for the Arts. Nov 20, 2017. Retrieved May 16, 2019.
  7. ^ "XYZ". Nga.gov. 2013-12-27. Retrieved 2019-05-16.
  8. ^ "Split Infinitive". www.nga.gov. Retrieved May 16, 2019.
  9. ^ "Untitled (Circular)". www.nga.gov. Retrieved May 16, 2019.
  10. ^ "Eve Aschheim | MoMA". The Museum of Modern Art. Retrieved May 16, 2019.
  11. ^ "Eve Aschheim – Museum of Contemporary Art North Miami". Retrieved May 16, 2019.