Flyy Girl

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Flyy Girl
FlyyGirlOmarTyree.jpg
Author Omar Tyree
Country United States
Language English
Genre Young adult literature
Published 1993
Publisher Mars Productions
Simon & Schuster

Flyy Girl is young adult/new adult literature and an urban fiction book written by Omar Tyree. The book was originally published by Mars Productions in 1993 and republished by Simon & Schuster for adults in 1996.[1] The novel is regarded to be the genesis of the modern urban-fiction/street-lit movement that would later gain momentum in 1999 with the publication of Sister Souljah's The Coldest Winter Ever.

Summary[edit]

An African American coming-of-age story that follows Tracy Ellison from her sixth birthday party in 1977 to her 17th birthday. Tracy grows up in the middle-class Philadelphia suburb of Germantown. The daughter of a dietitian and pharmacist, Tracy is beautiful, intelligent and armed with self-esteem and a sassy mouth. Tracy is also boy crazy, which leads to sex in the indulgent, hip-hop 1980s and the effects of the cocaine economy flourishing in black communities.

Sequels[edit]

Tyree wrote two sequels to Flyy Girl: For the Love of Money (2001) and Boss Lady (2006). Both were published by Simon & Schuster.

Film Adaptation[edit]

In July 2013, Lionsgate Entertainment's CodeBlack Films had acquired the rights to Flyy Girl with hopes of transforming the novel into a feature film.[2][3] In February 2015, CodeBlack Films announced that Dear White People producer Effie Brown was hired to produce a film adaptation of Omar Tyree's acclaimed novel Flyy Girl. Brown and her company, Duly Noted Inc., will oversee the film's development alongside Codeblack Films' Jeff Clanagan and Quincy Newell.[4]

On June 17, 2015, it was announced that Sanaa Lathan would star in and executive produce the film adaptation of Omar Tyree’s book trilogy Flyy Girl. Lathan will portray Tracy Ellison, a successful businesswoman and workaholic who believes that money is always the key to happiness. Geoffrey S. Fletcher was hired to write the script.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Flyy Girl". librarything.com. Retrieved 18 July 2013. 
  2. ^ "Lionsgate’s CodeBlack Films Acquires Rights To Omar Tyree’s ‘Flyy Girl’ Trilogy". deadline.com. 17 July 2013. Retrieved 18 July 2013. 
  3. ^ "Codeblack Films acquires rights to 'Flyy Girl' trilogy". chicagotribune.com. 17 July 2013. Retrieved 18 July 2013. 
  4. ^ "Effie Brown To Produce Film Adaptation Of Author Omar Tyree’s Flyy Girl | blackfilm.com/read". Blackfilm.com. 2015-03-12. Retrieved 2015-06-20. 
  5. ^ Dave McNary. "Sanaa Lathan Starring in ‘Flyy Girl’ Movie". Variety. Retrieved 2015-06-20.