Francis Drake (diplomat)

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Francis Drake (1764–1821), of Yardbury and Wells, was a British diplomat, holding positions at Genoa and Munich during the Napoleonic Wars.

Francis Drake was the son of Rev. Francis Drake, Vicar of Seaton and Beer. In 1790 Drake was appointed Secretary of Legation to the Court of Copenhagen.,[1] moving on to be Minister Resident at Venice[2] before becoming envoy to Genoa in 1793.[3] He took leave to return from Genoa to England to marry in 1795.[4] In 1799 he was appointed Envoy Extraordinary to the Elector Palatine, and Minister to the Diet of Ratisbon.[5] He kept up correspondence with French informants, and in 1804 was politically embarrassed when some letters, revealing the plans of Charles Pichegru and Georges Cadoudal to mount an uprising on the left bank of the Rhine, were intercepted by the French government and circulated to foreign ministers in Paris.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ London Gazette, 30 November 1790
  2. ^ London Gazette, 15 January 1793
  3. ^ Drake of Colyton Papers. Francis Drake, diplomat: 1792-3
  4. ^ Drake of Colyton Papers. Francis Drake, diplomat: 1794-5
  5. ^ London Gazette, 8 June 1799; Drake of Colyton Papers. Francis Drake, diplomat: 1795-1804
  6. ^ Procédure contre Georges, Pichegru, etc. : Correspondance de M. Drake, Paris, 1804. Geheime Instruction und Briefe des englischen Gesandten in München (F. Drake) an die englischen Agenten in Paris, 1804

External links[edit]

Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
William Lindsay
British Minister at Venice
1793
Succeeded by
unknown
Preceded by
unknown
British Resident at Genoa
1793–1795
Succeeded by
unknown
Preceded by
Arthur Paget (diplomat)
British envoy to Elector Palatinate
1799–1805
Succeeded by
unknown