Frank Webb (artist)

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Frank Webb
Born1927 (age 91–92)
NationalityAmerican
Known forWatercolor painting

Frank Webb (born 1927) is an American watercolor painter from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Webb is a graduate of the Art Institute of Pittsburgh.[1]

Biography[edit]

Webb was born in 1927 in North Versailles, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Pittsburgh. He served in the US Navy during World War II and was recalled during the Korean War to serve aboard the USS Macon.[2] He enrolled at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh via the GI Bill and worked as a commercial illustrator after graduation, eventually taking over and running a commercial studio.[3]

In 1970 Webb enrolled in a watercolor workshop led by Edgar Whitney, and subsequently began exhibiting extensively, becoming a member of the American Watercolor Society in 1973. Webb retired from his commercial studio in 1980 and began teaching workshops in watercolor painting. He has taught over 500 workshops in every state in the United States as well as internationally.[4]

Webb aboard the USS Macon, 1952

Publications, Honors, Awards[edit]

Webb was awarded the Mario Cooper & Dale Meyers Medal from the American Watercolor Society in 2013, and is recognized as a TWSA Master by the Transparent Watercolor Society of America.[5] He is also a member of the National Watercolor Society, Audubon Artists, Pennsylvania Watercolor Society, and is an honorary lifetime member of the Pittsburgh Watercolor Society and the Philadelphia Watercolor Society.

Webb is the author of three instructional books on watercolor painting: Watercolor Energies, Webb on Watercolor, and Strengthen Your Paintings With Dynamic Composition.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://watercolorpainting.com/frank-webb-2/
  2. ^ "Salty Newsmen Pass the Word" (PDF). All Hands, The Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin. June 1952. p. 10-11.
  3. ^ "Vignettes: Frank Webb". Newsletter of the American Watercolor Society. Winter 2014. p. 9-10.
  4. ^ Alicia Mayes (2001-01-05). "Bold Strokes". The Gaston Gazette.
  5. ^ "2018 Award Winners". Transparent Watercolor Society of America.
  6. ^ Grant, Daniel (2002): How to Grow as an Artist, Allworth Communications, ISBN 1-58115-244-2.

External links[edit]