Gary Cox (philosopher)

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Gary Cox
Gary Cox Philosopher Image1.png
Born 1964
England
Nationality British
Education PhD in Philosophy (1996)
Alma mater University of Birmingham
Occupation Philosopher, biographer, writer

Gary Cox (born 1964, England)[1] is a British philosopher and biographer and the author of several books on Jean-Paul Sartre, existentialism, general philosophy and philosophy of sport.[2]

A Philosophy graduate of the University of Southampton, UK, he was awarded his PhD in 1996 from the University of Birmingham, UK, for his thesis on Jean-Paul Sartre's theory of consciousness, freedom and bad faith[3] and is an honorary research fellow of that same university.[4] His most notable works to date are The Sartre Dictionary (2008), How to Be an Existentialist, or How to Get Real, Get a Grip and Stop Making Excuses (2009) and The God Confusion: Why Nobody Knows the Answer to the Ultimate Question (2013).

Cox’s early publications reflect his research into both the philosophical, fictional and biographical writings of Jean-Paul Sartre, with his book, The Sartre Dictionary, providing a comprehensive overview of Sartre’s major works, ideas, influences and contemporaries.[5] From 2009 onwards, with the publication of his best selling book to date, How to Be an Existentialist, Gary Cox took the ideas of existentialism to a wider, non-specialist audience, emphasising the self-help and personal empowerment aspects of the theory.[6] An attack on contemporary 'excuse culture', the work urges the reader to face the hard existential truths of the human condition and to take full responsibility for his or her inalienable freedom.[7] How to Be an Existentialist has been cited in such diverse areas as existential counselling[8] and management and leadership training.[9]

In 2010, Cox continued his efforts to popularise philosophy in the UK with the publication of How to Be a Philosopher, or How to Be Almost Certain that Almost Nothing is Certain, a beginners' guide to philosophy written in the same accessible, popular style as How to Be an Existentialist.[10] 2011 saw the publication of his Existentialist’s Guide to Death, the Universe and Nothingness, a guide to key existentialist themes that, as its title suggests, is something of a homage to Douglas Adams. In 2013 Cox published The God Confusion, a controversial book exploring questions concerning the idea and existence of God that is critical of both theism and atheism and advocates agnosticism as the only tenable philosophical position.[11]

Bloomsbury Publishing released Deep Thought: 42 Fantastic Quotes that Define Philosophy in October 2015, and his biography of Jean-Paul Sartre - Existentialism and Excess: The Life and Times of Jean-Paul Sartre - in September 2016.

Cox's next book, Cricket Ball (Bloomsbury, 2017) is an excursion into object-oriented ontology and the philosophy, politics, aesthetics and literature of sport. A celebration of the game of cricket, the book explores all aspects of the cricket ball phenomenon, from its ontology, iconic status, history, manufacture and future, to its complex, multifaceted, often controversial role during play.[12]

Works[edit]

  • Cricket Ball, Bloomsbury, 2017.
  • Existentialism and Excess: The Life and Times of Jean-Paul Sartre - Bloomsbury, 2016.
  • Deep Thought: 42 Fantastic Quotes that Define Philosophy - Bloomsbury, 2015.
  • The God Confusion: Why Nobody Knows the Answer to the Ultimate Question - Bloomsbury, 2013.
  • The Existentialist’s Guide to Death, the Universe and Nothingness - Continuum, 2011.
  • How to Be a Philosopher, or How to Be Almost Certain that Almost Nothing is Certain - Continuum, 2010.
  • How to Be an Existentialist, or How to Get Real, Get a Grip and Stop Making Excuses - Continuum, 2009.
  • Sartre and Fiction - Continuum, 2009.
  • The Sartre Dictionary - Continuum, 2008.
  • Sartre: A Guide for the Perplexed - Continuum, 2006.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data, Cox, Gary 1964-
  2. ^ See Cricket Ball, Bloomsbury, 2017
  3. ^ "A Consideration of the Sartrean Conception of Consciousness, Freedom and Bad Faith", Birmingham: Birmingham University, 1996, Bib Id: 1352917
  4. ^ http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/schools/ptr/departments/philosophy/staff/index.aspx
  5. ^ The Sartre Dictionary, Continuum, 2008.
  6. ^ How to Be an existentialist, or How to Get Real, Get a Grip and Stop Making Excuses, Continuum, 2009
  7. ^ "The Philosophers' Magazine": http://www.philosophypress.co.uk/?p=904
  8. ^ van Deurzen, Emmy and Adams, Martin, "Skills in Existential Counselling and Psychotherapy". London: Sage, 2011, p. 156
  9. ^ http://www.leader-values.com/Content/detail.asp?ContentDetailID=1405
  10. ^ How to Be a Philosopher, Continuum, 2010
  11. ^ The God Confusion, Bloomsbury, 2013
  12. ^ https://twitter.com/garycox01/status/851852253375995904

External links[edit]