Gelonin

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Gelonin is known as the "ribosome-inactivating protein" and is currently on the radar of a lot of researchers, as a potential treatment for cancer. Gelonin is a protein toxin of approximately 30 kDa found in the seeds of the Himalayan plant Gelonium multiflorum. In cell-free systems gelonin exerts powerful N-glycosidase activity on the 28S rRNA unit of eukaryotic ribosomes by cleaving out adenine at the 4324 site. Gelonin lacks carbohydrate-binding domain, which are comprised as Beta-chains, so it is unable to cross the plasma membrane, making it highly effective in cell free systems.[1]

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  1. ^ Chemie, V.F (2012). The ribosome-inactivating protein gelonin and parts thereof to be employed for a potential treatment of cancer. (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from https://kluedo.ub.uni-kl.de/files/3215/Dissertation+M.+Badr.pdf
  • Chemie, V.F (2012). The ribosome-inactivating protein gelonin and parts thereof to be employed for a potential treatment of cancer. (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from https://kluedo.ub.uni-kl.de/files/3215/Dissertation+M.+Badr.pdf
  • Stirpe, F., Olsnes, S. & Pihl, A. Gelonin, a new inhibitor of protein synthesis, nontoxic to intact cells. Isolation, characterization, and preparation of cytotoxic complexes with concanavalin A. J. Biol. Chem. 255, 6947-6953 (1980)