George Avery Young

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George Avery Young
Full name George Avery Young
Place of birth Tynemouth, England
Place of death Penarth, Wales
School Malvern School
Rugby union career
Position(s) Forward
Amateur team(s)
Years Team Apps (Points)
National team(s)
Years Team Apps (Points)
1886 Wales Wales 2 (0)

George Avery Young (June, 1866-21 January 1900) was an English-born sportsman who played international rugby union for Wales[1] and cricket for Glamorgan.[2]

Rugby career[edit]

Although born in Tynemouth in the North of England, Young moved to Wales where he came to note as a sportsman. His first major club was Cardiff, and while serving with the 'Blues' he was selected to represent Wales in the country's opening game of the 1886 Home Nations Championship, against England. Under the captaincy of Charlie Newman, Young was one of five Cardiff players to represent Wales on the day, with teammates Billy Douglas and Dai Lewis joining Young as first caps. His second and final cap was the next game of the 1886 Championship, this time against Scotland, which Wales again lost.

During the 1886/87 season, Young was given the captaincy of Cardiff, which he held for two seasons.[3]

International games played[edit]

Wales[4]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Godwin, Terry (1984). The International Rugby Championship 1883-1983. Grafton Street, London: Willow Books. ISBN 0-00-218060-X. 
  • Griffiths, Terry (1987). The Phoenix Book of International Rugby Records. London: Phoenix House. ISBN 0-460-07003-7. 
  • Smith, David; Williams, Gareth (1980). Fields of Praise: The Official History of The Welsh Rugby Union. Cardiff: University of Wales Press. ISBN 0-7083-0766-3. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ WRU player profile
  2. ^ Cricketarchive.com Player profiles
  3. ^ Marshall, Francis Football; the Rugby union game (1892) Cassell and company Ltd. pg 265
  4. ^ Smith (1980), pg 474.

External links[edit]

Rugby Union Captain
Preceded by
Billy Douglas
Cardiff RFC Captain
1887-89
Succeeded by
Frank Hill