George H. Newhall

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George H. Newhall
George H. Newhall 1908.png
35th Mayor
of Lynn, Massachusetts
In office
1913–1917
Preceded by William P. Connery, Sr.
Succeeded by Walter H. Creamer
Member of the
Massachusetts
House of Representatives
12th Essex District
In office
1906–1908
Succeeded by Martin L. Quinn
Member of the
Massachusetts
House of Representatives
17th Essex District[2]
In office
1894[1] – 1895[1]
Personal details
Born Lynn, Massachusetts
October 24, 1850[1]
Died November 4, 1923(1923-11-04) (aged 73)[3]
Political party Republican[2][4]

George H. Newhall (October 24, 1850 – November 4, 1923) was a Massachusetts politician who served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives, as a member of the Board of Aldermen and a member and President of the Common Council of Lynn, Massachusetts[1] and as the 35th Mayor of Lynn.

George H. Newhall in 1894

Newhall was born in Lynn, Massachusetts on October 24, 1850. Newhall attended Wilbraham Wesleyan Academy in Wilbraham, Massachusetts.[1]

Business career[edit]

Newhall was involved in the manufacture of Shoes. He later became involved in the real estate and insurance business. He was also the President of the Lynn City Street Railway Company.[1]

Political career[edit]

Newhall was a member of the Lynn Common Council in 1886 to 1887, he was the President of the Common Council in 1887. From 1889 to 1890 and again from 1904 to 1905 he was a member of the Lynn Board of Aldermen.[1]

From 1913 to 1917 Newhall was the Mayor of Lynn, Massachusetts.

Political offices
Preceded by
William P. Connery, Sr.
Mayor of Lynn, Massachusetts
1913 to 1917
Succeeded by
Walter H. Creamer

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Bridgman, Arthur Milnor (1908), A Souvenir of Massachusetts Legislators, Volume XVII, Stoughton, MA: A. M. Bridgman, p. 146. 
  2. ^ a b Bridgman, Arthur Milnor (1894), A Souvenir of Massachusetts Legislators, Volume III, Brockton, MA: A. M. Bridgman, p. 141. 
  3. ^ George H. Newhall's obituary
  4. ^ Who's Who in State Politics, 1908, Boston, MA: Practical Politics, 1908, p. 264.