Giovanni Manzuoli

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Giovanni Manzuoli

Giovanni Manzuoli (Giovanni Manzoli) (1720–1782) was an Italian castrato who sang as a soprano at the beginning of his career, and later as a contralto.[1]

History[edit]

Born in Florence, Italy, Manzuoli began singing there in 1731. After performing in Verona in 1735, he relocated and performed in Naples until 1748, including at the recently built (1737) Teatro di San Carlo.[2] He is documented as also singing and acting in the following locales for the years indicated:

During Manzuoli's sojourn to London, he became friends with the Mozart family.[4] While in Milan, he was appointed Chamber Singer to the Duke of Tuscany. His final appearance was in Milano in 1771. He died eleven years later.[5]

Description of performance[edit]

Charles Burney, a contemporary music historian, described the Florentine castrato thus: "Manzoli's voice was the most powerful and voluminous soprano that had ever been heard on our stage since the time of Farinelli; and his manner of singing was grand and full of dignity. The applause he received was a universal thunder of acclimation."[6]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hansell, Kathleen Kuzmick. "Manzuoli, Giovanni" IN The New Grove Dictionary of Opera New York : Grove's Dictionaries of Music 1992, vol. 3, p. 197.
  2. ^ "Manzuoli, Giovanni" IN Baker's Biographical Dictionary of Musicians New York : Schirmer Books, 2001, vol. 4, p. 2273.
  3. ^ "Manzuoli, Giovanni" IN Baker's Biographical Dictionary of Musicians New York : Schirmer Books, 2001, vol. 4, p. 2273.
  4. ^ Woodfield, Ian. 'New Light on the Mozart's London Visit: A Private Concert with Manzuoli. Music and Letters, Vol. 76, No. 2 (May 1995), pp. 187–208.
  5. ^ Hansell, Kathleen Kuzmick. "Manzuoli, Giovanni" IN The New Grove Dictionary of Opera New York : Grove's Dictionaries of Music 1992, vol. 3, pp. 197–198.
  6. ^ Smith, Horace and Woodworth, Samuel. Festivals, games, and amusements: ancient and modern New York : J. & J. Harper, 1831, p. 251 (OCLC 166595930)