Gunnar Schjelderup

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Gunnar Schjelderup (5 April 1895 – 6 March 1972) was a Norwegian businessperson.

Personal life[edit]

He was born in Christiania,[1] and was the brother of judge Ferdinand Schjelderup.[2] He was a son of Thorleif Frederik Schjelderup, nephew of Bredo Henrik von Munthe af Morgenstierne and uncle of ski jumper Thorleif Schjelderup.

Career[edit]

Gunnar Schjelderup took his education as an engineer in 1917 in Dresden. In 1926 he took over as CEO of iron- and steelware factory Christiania Spigerverk,[2] where his father had been co-owner.[3] He retired in 1961.[2] He had also invested heavily in Bremanger Smelteverk in Svelgen.[4]

In April 1940, following the German invasion of Norway and the Vidkun Quisling coup d'etat, Gunnar Schjelderup and others contacted the Supreme Court to establish a civil administrative council, Administrasjonsrådet, to normalize working life as soon as possible. The council was established a few days after the invasion.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Family genealogy
  2. ^ a b c "Schjelderup, Gunnar". Aschehoug og Gyldendals Store norske leksikon. Kunnskapsforlaget. 2007. 
  3. ^ "Schjelderup, Thorleif Frederik". Aschehoug og Gyldendals Store norske leksikon. Kunnskapsforlaget. 2007. 
  4. ^ Gunnar Schjelderup at NRK Sogn og Fjordane County Encyclopedia (Norwegian)
  5. ^ "Administrasjonsrådet". PaxLeksikon. Oslo: Pax forlag. 1976. Retrieved 2008-10-16.