H band

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This article is about the radio band. For the region of the sarcomere, see sarcomere.
NATO H band
Frequency range
6 - 8 GHz
Wavelength range
5 – 3.75 cm
Related bands
  • C (IEEE)
  • SHF (ITU)

H band can refer to two different regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, in the radio and near-infrared.

NATO H band[edit]

The NATO H band is the obsolete designation given to the radio frequencies from 6 000 to 8 000 MHz (equivalent to wavelengths between 5 and 3.75 cm) during the cold war period. Since 1992 frequency allocations, allotment and assignments are in line to NATO Joint Civil/Military Frequency Agreement (NJFA).[1] However, in order to identify military radio spectrum requirements, e.g. for crises management planning, training, Electronic warfare activities, or in military operations, this system is still in use.

NATO Radio spectrum designation
LATEST SYSTEM ALTERNATIVE SYSTEM
BAND FREQUENCY (MHz) BAND FREQUENCY (MHz)
A 0 – 250 I 100 – 150
B 250 – 500 G 150 – 225
C 500 – 1 000 P 225 – 390
D 1 000 – 2 000 L 390 – 1 550
E 2 000 – 3 000 S 1 550 – 3 900
F 3 000 – 4 000 C 3 900 – 6 200
G 4 000 – 6 000 X 6 200 – 10 900
H 6 000 – 8 000 K 10 900 – 36 000
I 8 000 – 10 000 Ku 10 900 – 20 000
J 10 000 – 20 000 Ka 20 000 – 36 000
K 20 000 – 40 000 Q 36 000 – 46 000
L 40 000 – 60 000 V 46 000 – 56 000
M 60 000 – 100 000 W 56 000 – 100 000

Infrared astronomy[edit]

Atmospheric windows in the infrared. The H band is the transmission window centred on 1.65 micrometres

In infrared astronomy, the H band refers to an atmospheric transmission window centred on 1.65 micrometres with a Full width at half maximum of 0.35 micrometres[2] (in the near-infrared).

References[edit]

  1. ^ NATO Joint Civil/Military Frequency Agreement (NJFA)
  2. ^ Ian McClean, Electronic Imaging in Astronomy, Second Edition, Springer, 2008.