HackRF One

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HackRF One is a wide band software defined radio (SDR) half-duplex transceiver created and manufactured by Great Scott Gadgets. Its creator, Michael Ossman, launched a successful KickStarter campaign in 2014 with a first run of the project called HackRF (Project Jawbone).[1] The hardware and software's open source nature has attracted hackers, amateur radio enthusiasts, and information security practitioners.

The HackRF One PCB by Great Scott Gadgets

Overview[edit]

The HackRF One is capable of receiving and transmitting on a frequency range of 1Mhz to 6Ghz with output power of 30 mW to 1 mW depending on the band.[2] The unit comes with an SMA antenna port, CLKIN/CLKOUT SMA ports and a 2.0 USB port. The HackRF One integrates with GNU Radio and SDR# projects to provide its graphical user interface.[3] The popularity of HackRF One as a security research platform has made it featured in many InfoSec conference talks such as BlackHat, DEF CON and BSides.[4][5][6]

Academic research[edit]

Kimmo Heinäaro presented a paper at the 2015 International Conference on Military Communications and Information Systems (ICMCIS) outlining how military tactical communications could be hacked with HackRF One and other open source tools.[7]

In 2017, researchers were able to use HackRF One in a GPS Spoofing attack to feed a vehicle false signals and mapping data to deliver the occupants to a desired location.[8]

Media attention[edit]

The HackRF One has received criticism in several media reports because it can be used to intercept the key fob signals to open car doors.[9][10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Update 24: Antennas · HackRF, an open source SDR platform". Kickstarter. Retrieved 2018-02-20.
  2. ^ Jones, Jon (January 2017). "HackRF One". QST Magazine.
  3. ^ Ossmann, Michael (2018-02-17), hackrf: low cost software radio platform, retrieved 2018-02-20
  4. ^ "Black Hat USA 2017". www.blackhat.com. Retrieved 2018-02-20.
  5. ^ Adrian Crenshaw (2015-09-12), RT100 Using a HackRF One to Infiltrate the Digital Thetford Wall Patrick Perry, retrieved 2018-02-20
  6. ^ "Software defined radio talks from Defcon 23 - rtl-sdr.com". www.rtl-sdr.com. Retrieved 2018-02-20.
  7. ^ Military Communications and Information Systems (ICMCIS), 2015 International Conference on : date 18-19 May 2015. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers,. [Piscataway, New Jersey]. ISBN 9788393484850. OCLC 949403479.
  8. ^ HotMobile'17 : proceedings of the 18th International Workshop on Mobile Computing Systems and Applications : February 21-22, 2017, Sonoma, CA, USA. ACM SIGMOBILE,, Association for Computing Machinery,. New York, New York. ISBN 9781450349079. OCLC 981765641.
  9. ^ "Amazon And eBay Slammed For Selling Device That Lets Thieves Break Into Cars". HuffPost UK. 2017-05-15. Retrieved 2018-02-20.
  10. ^ Sandeman, George (2017-05-15). "Amazon sells gadget used for breaking into cars". The Times. ISSN 0140-0460. Retrieved 2018-02-20.