Hans Christian von Baeyer

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Hans Christian von Baeyer (born 1938) is a Chancellor Professor of Physics at the College of William and Mary. His books include Information: The New Language of Science, Warmth Disperses and Time Passes: The History of Heat and QBism: The Future of Quantum Physics.

Recipient of the Science Journalism Award of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the National Magazine Award, which cites his "uncommon literary grace".[1][2] He also received the 2005 Andrew Gemant Award for science writing, for prose "crisp, captivating and illuminating" with "depth, passion and clarity" in the ideas conveyed.[3]

von Baeyer gradauted from Columbia College in 1958 and received his M.S. from the University of Miami and Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University.[4]He is a descendant of German geologist and military officer Johann Jacob Baeyer, whose son, Adolf von Baeyer, won the 1905 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.[5]

Works[edit]

  • Rainbows, Snowflakes, and Quarks: Physics and the World Around Us. New York: McGraw-Hill. 1984. ISBN 0-07-067545-7.
  • The Fermi solution: Essays on Science. New York: Random House. 1993. ISBN 0-679-40031-1.
  • Taming the Atom: The Emergence of the Visible Microworld (Penguin Science). London, England: Penguin Books Ltd. 1994. ISBN 0-14-015621-6.
  • Warmth Disperses and Time Passes: The History of Heat. New York: The Modern Library. 1999. ISBN 0-375-75372-9.
  • Information: The New Language of Science. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. 2004. ISBN 0-674-01387-5.
  • QBism: The Future of Quantum Physics. Cambridge, Mass.: Havard University Press. 2016.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Hans Christian Von Baeyer | Penguin Random House". PenguinRandomhouse.com. Retrieved 2020-07-02.
  2. ^ Baeyer, Hans Christian Von (2001-01-01). The Fermi Solution: Essays on Science. Courier Corporation. ISBN 978-0-486-41707-3.
  3. ^ "AIP Bestows Gemant Award on Von Baeyer". Physics Today. 58 (6): 73. 2007-01-12. doi:10.1063/1.1996484. ISSN 0031-9228.
  4. ^ "Hans C. von Baeyer". www.physics.wm.edu. Retrieved 2020-07-02.
  5. ^ "That Relentless Whirligig: What Physics Tells us about Time". Wolf Humanities Center. 2015-02-11. Retrieved 2020-07-02.

External links[edit]