Hans Imelmann

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Hans Imelmann
Born 14 May 1897
Hannover, German Empire
Died 23 January 1917(1917-01-23) (aged 19)
Vicinity of Miraumont, France
Allegiance German Empire
Service/branch Aviation
Rank Leutnant
Unit KEK Metz, Jasta 2
Awards Iron Cross

Leutnant Hans Imelmann IC was a World War I flying ace credited with six aerial victories. As a founding member of one of Germany's original fighter squadrons, he was shot down and killed before he reached his twentieth birthday.

Biography[edit]

Hans Imelmann was born in Hannover, the German Empire, on 14 May 1897.[1]

His first known military service was as a Fokker Eindekker pilot for one of the early ad hoc fighter units, Kampfeinsitzerkommando (Combat Single-Seater Command) Metz, in 1916. He was selected by Oswald Boelcke as a pilot for Germany's new fighter squadron, Royal Prussian Jagdstaffel 2, upon its formation. Between 10 October and 20 December 1916, he was credited with six confirmed victories.[1] Imelmann's third victory set Nieuport 17 no. A162 from No. 60 Squadron RFC aflame, but its pilot, British ace Ernest Foot somehow escaped its crash-landing uninjured.[2]

On 23 January 1917, Imelmann became one of the first aces killed in action. Imelmann attacked a Royal Aircraft Factory BE.2c belonging to No. 4 Squadron RFC near Miraumont, France. A burst of machine gun fire through his fuel tank sent Imelmann down in flames.[3]

Endnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Franks et al 1993, p. 134.
  2. ^ Shores et al 1990, p. 154.
  3. ^ The Aerodrome

References[edit]

  • Franks, Norman; Bailey, Frank W.; Guest, Russell. Above the Lines: The Aces and Fighter Units of the German Air Service, Naval Air Service and Flanders Marine Corps, 1914–1918. Grub Street, 1993. ISBN 0-948817-73-9, ISBN 978-0-948817-73-1.
  • Shores, Christopher; Franks, Norman; Guest, Russell. Above the Trenches: A Complete Record of the Fighter Aces and Units of the British Empire Air Forces 1915–1920. Grub Street, 1990. ISBN 0-948817-19-4, ISBN 978-0-948817-19-9.

External links[edit]