Hans Peter L'Orange (academic)

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Hans Peter L'Orange

Hans Peter L'Orange (2 March 1903 – 5 December 1983) was a Norwegian art historian and classical archaeologist.[1]

Biography[edit]

L'Orange was born in Kristiania as a son of Major General Hans Wilhelm L'Orange (1868–1950) and Ginni Gulbranson (1879–1949). His family had its origin from among the French Huguenots. He was a paternal grandson of Hans Peter L'Orange, maternal grandson of Carl August Gulbranson, and brother-in-law of journalist and writer, Gunnar Larsen (1900-1958).[2][3]

From 1930-36 he was a university fellow resident in Rome. He took the dr.philos. degree in 1933 with his thesis Studien zur Geschichte des spätantiken Porträts. He was a professor of classical archaeology at the University of Oslo from 1942 to 1973. In 1959 he and professor Hjalmar Torpe established the Norwegian Institute in Rome (Det norske institutt i Roma) as an affiliate of the University of Oslo. The institute established a permanent Norwegian base for research and studies of the Mediterranean countries. He was director of the institute until he retired in 1973. [4]

He was a visiting professor at Harvard University (1950) and at Johns Hopkins University (1966–1967). In 1969 he was awarded the Arts Council Norway Honorary Award (Norsk kulturråds ærespris). [3][1] [5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Henriksen, Petter, ed. (2007). "Hans Peter L'Orange". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Oslo: Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 8 November 2010. 
  2. ^ Bratberg, Terje. "Lorange". Norsk biografisk leksikon (in Norwegian). Oslo: Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 8 April 2011. 
  3. ^ a b Eliassen, Kristin. "Hans Peter L'Orange". In Helle, Knut. Norsk biografisk leksikon (in Norwegian). Oslo: Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 8 November 2010. 
  4. ^ "Det norske institutt i Roma". University of Oslo. Retrieved May 1, 2018. 
  5. ^ "Norsk kulturråds ærespris". Store norske leksikon. Retrieved May 1, 2018. 
Awards
Preceded by
Frits von der Lippe
Recipient of the Arts Council Norway Honorary Award
1969
Succeeded by
Alf Prøysen