Harry J. Lincoln

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Harry James Lincoln aka Harry Jay Lincoln (13 April 1878 Shamokin, Pennsylvania – 19 April 1937 Philadelphia) was a music composer from Williamsport, Pennsylvania.

Career[edit]

Aside from running his own publication company, he wrote many marches and rags, such as the Bees Wax Rag (1911), the Lincoln Highway two step march (1921), and quite possibly the Repasz Band March (1901). This last composition, created for the local Repasz Band of Williamsport, Pennsylvania (founded in 1831 and currently the oldest brass band still in existence in the United States), has also been credited to its trombonist Charles C. Sweeley; however, evidence indicates that Sweeley had bought rights to the march from Lincoln.[1][2]

Pseudonyms[edit]

Lincoln often used several pseudonyms, a common practice for composers who published in their own firm. His pseudonyms included:

  1. Thomas Casele
  2. Ben E. Crosby
  3. James L. Dempsey
  4. I. Furman-Mulliner
  5. James L. Harlin
  6. Frederick M. Holmes
  7. Harry Jay[3][4]
  8. Joseph Kiefer
  9. Abe Losch ("Losch" was the maiden name of his mother)
  10. Carl Loveland
  11. Carl L. Loveland
  12. Gay A. Rimert
  13. Lillian H. Sarver
  14. Chas. C. Sweeley
  15. Caird M. Vandersloot
  16. Carl D. Vandersloot
  17. F. W. Vandersloot
  18. Jesse Westover
  19. Frederick Williams

Death[edit]

Lincoln died in April 19, 1937, at the age of 59.

Selected compositions[edit]

  • "A Jolly Sailor"
  • "Alameda Waltzes" (1908)
  • "American Emblem" (1923)
  • "Bang Up Two Step" (1913)
  • "Bees Wax Rag" (1911) (Audio recording)
  • "Belle of the Season" (1924)
  • "Blaze of Honour" (1915)
  • "Buffalo Flyer"[5]
  • "Canonade" (1928)
  • "Circus Life" (1914)
  • "Dance Of The Fairies" (1912)
  • "Dixie A Rag Caprice" (1911)
  • "Dreaming at Twilight" (1915)
  • "Dreamy Swanee Lullaby" (1917)
    (a collaboration of Lincoln and George C. Pennington)
  • "Emblem of Peace" (1923)
  • "Empire Express"[5]
  • "Excuse Me But Isn't Your Name Johnson?" (1907)
  • "Ferns and Flowers"
  • "Flowers of the Forest"
  • "Garden of Lilies" (1913)
  • "Girls of America" (1923)
  • Glory of Womanhood (1917)
  • Heaven's Artillery: March Two Step (1904)
  • "Midnight Special"[5]
  • "Palm Limited[5]
  • "Sunset Limited" (1910)[5]
  • "Halley's Comet Rag" (1910)
  • "The Iron Division" (1919)

Family[edit]

Lincoln married Lottie May Bovee (maiden) June 14, 1898, in Elmira, New York.[6][7] They had two children:

  1. Margaret Emily Lincoln Walther (born to their marriage; 1904–1933),[8] and
  2. Harry Jay Lincoln, Jr. (adopted; 1929–1952)

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

General references[edit]

  1. The Heritage Encyclopedia of Band Music, Composers and their music, (Vol. 3 of 3; Supplement), by William H. Rehrig (né William Harold Rehrig; born 1939), edited by Paul Edmund Bierley (1926–1916), Integrity Press, Westerville, Ohio (1996); OCLC 923878262

Inline citations[edit]

  1. ^ "Repasz Band". Archived from the original on 2014-09-06. Retrieved 28 Sep 2011. 
  2. ^ The Heritage Encyclopedia of Band Music, Composers and Their Music (Vol. 1 of 2), by William H. Rehrig (né William Harold Rehrig; born 1939), edited by Paul Edmund Bierley (1926–1916), Integrity Press, Westerville, Ohio (1991); OCLC 477210625
  3. ^ "Harry J. Lincoln," www.ragpiano.com (website of "Perfessor" Bill Edwards)
  4. ^ "Harry J. Lincoln and Charles C. Sweeley," by Matthew Caulfield, posted on Mechanical Music Digest (www.mmdigest.com; Jody Kravitz, Publisher; Robbie Rhodes, Editor; The Foxtail Group, Santee, California), September 17, 1998 (retrieved August 2, 2017, via archive.li)
  5. ^ a b c d e "Sunset Limited". Duke University. Retrieved 2011-12-06. 
  6. ^ "1900 US Census," "Harry J Lincoln," Williamsport, Pennsylvania, citing enumeration district 85, sheet 11A, family 230, NARA microfilm publication T623 (1972); FHL microfilm 1,241,438 (retrieved August 2, 2017, via FamilySearch)
  7. ^ "Williamsport," The Times (Philadelphia), June 19, 1998, pg. 15, col. 2 (retrieved August 2, 2017, via newspapers.com at www.newspapers.com/image/53399902, fee required)
  8. ^ "Out of Town," Williamsport Gazette (Williamsport, Pennsylvania), August 15, 1911, pg. 3, col. 3