Hebrew republic

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The Hebrew Republic, also “De Republica Hebraeorum”, and also “Respublica Hebraeorum”, is an early modern concept in political theory in which Christian scholars regarded the Hebrew Bible as a political constitution framing a perfect and republican government designed by God for the children of Israel.[1][2][3]

Among the most notable works in the genre are “De Republica Hebraeorum” by Petrus Cunaeus [4][5] and Eric Nelson's "The Hebrew Republic".[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog/NELHEB.html
  2. ^ Tuck, Richard, Philosophy and government, 1572-1651, Cambridge, 1993, p. 167
  3. ^ Lea Campos Boralevi, Classical Foundational Myths of European Republicanism: The Jewish Commonwealth, in Martin van Gelderen and Quentin Skinner, Republicanism: A Shared European Heritage, Cambridge University Press, 2002 , p. 258
  4. ^ Tuck, Richard, Philosophy and government, 1572-1651, Cambridge, 1993, p. 167
  5. ^ Lea Campos Boralevi, Classical Foundational Myths of European Republicanism: The Jewish Commonwealth, in Martin van Gelderen and Quentin Skinner, Republicanism: A Shared European Heritage, Cambridge University Press, 2002 , p. 258
  6. ^ Eric Nelson, “The Hebrew Republic: Jewish Sources and the Transformation of European Political Thought” (Harvard University Press, 2010)