Helen Haywood

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Helen Riviere Haywood (1907-1995) was an English artist and writer, known for her illustrations of children's books and her fore-edge and binding paintings.

Early life[edit]

Haywood was born in England in 1907,[1] but was taken as a child to Chile, where her father, an engineer, worked on the trans-Andean railway. She remained in Chile until she was approximately 15 years old. Her experiences were recounted in an unpublished novel, Childhood in Chile.

Career[edit]

Her books were published by Thomas Nelson Ltd through the 1950s and 1960s. She created a series of books based around the character Peter Tiggywig and friends.

Other work includes Master Mouse the Madcap (1958), and Animal Playtime and Animal Worktime which appeared in the Look with Mother series, and a paperback series for children published by Nelson including 'Aesop's Fables'(1965) 'Brer Rabbit' and the 'Water Babies' (abridged)

Miss Haywood was a keen student of science and an amateur naturalist and anthropologist. Many of the books she illustrated for the publisher Hutchinson & Co., London, were keenly observed and scrupulously accurate depictions of plants, birds and animals. When commissioned to do illustrations for a children's book on dinosaurs, her research into the skin colors she subsequently chose for her dinosaur illustrations was cited by the Royal Academy of Sciences.

Haywood was also a practitioner of the arts of fore-edge painting[2] and binding paintings.[3] She became acquainted with the art forms through an uncle who was associated with the Bayntun-Riviere Bindery of Bath. She did several fore-edge and double fore-edge paintings on commission every year from the 1930s to the 1970s for Inman's Books, an antiquarian book dealer in New York City.

She died in Bournemouth, England in 1995.

Selected works[edit]

Illustrated by Helen Haywood[edit]

Written by Isobel St Vincent[edit]

  • Wanda the Panda (1939)[4][5] OCLC 179178742, 314735807
  • Woodland Verse (1940)[6][7] OCLC 78401748, 504479890, 774488312
  • Figgles Frog Sees Life (1940)[8] OCLC 179178649
  • Sandy's Seven Tails (1943)[9] OCLC 811586967, 558854281
  • All A-Growing: the adventures of two young gardeners (1943)[9] OCLC 30375749, 504479463
  • The Helen Haywood Colour Book (1944)[10] OCLC 179178660
  • British Butterflies and Moths (1952)[11] OCLC 30203867, 877567361

Written by Geoffrey Ford[edit]

Written by others[edit]

Written and illustrated by Helen Haywood[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Connelly, William. "The Life and Work of Helen Haywood (1907-1995)." IBIS Journal 3 - Diverse Talents (2009): 98-143.
  2. ^ "Rare Books: Burke Fore-edge". Columbus College of Art and Design. Retrieved 16 February 2019.
  3. ^ Gertz, Stephen J. (3 October 2012). "The Binding Paintings of Helen R. Haywood". Booktryst. Retrieved 16 February 2019.
  4. ^ Critic (8 December 1939). "Some New Books - Interesting Reading for West-Country Folk". Exeter and Plymouth Gazette. p. 5. Retrieved 15 February 2019.
  5. ^ "Books as Yuletide Gifts". Belfast News-Letter. 9 December 1939. p. 10. Retrieved 15 February 2019.
  6. ^ "Christmas Books". The Age. Melbourne, Australia. 22 November 1940. p. 13. Retrieved 14 February 2019.
  7. ^ "Orient and Occident". The Scotsman. 5 December 1940. p. 2. Retrieved 16 February 2019.
  8. ^ "Realms of Fancy". The Scotsman. 5 December 1940. p. 4. Retrieved 14 February 2019.
  9. ^ a b "For Younger Readers - Forest Folk; Nature Study". The Scotsman. 25 November 1943. p. 7. Retrieved 16 February 2019.
  10. ^ "Stories and Pictures". The Scotsman. 23 November 1944. p. 6. Retrieved 14 February 2019.
  11. ^ "For Younger Children". The Guardian. London, England. 24 June 1952. p. 3. Retrieved 14 February 2019.
  12. ^ Reviews of Hedgehog's Holiday:
    • Farjeon, Eleanor (4 December 1938). "Authors v. Artists". The Observer. London, England. p. 18. Retrieved 14 February 2019.
    • Sharp, Evelyn (9 December 1938). "Best of Both Worlds". The Guardian (Supplement to the Manchester Guardian). p. XIV. Retrieved 14 February 2019.
  13. ^ Culpepper, Donnell (24 October 1974). "All Outdoors - Good season seen for chukar, quail". The Independent. Longbeach, California. p. C8. Retrieved 15 February 2019.
  14. ^ Bookman (13 December 1926). "Christmas Reading - More Children's Books". Sheffield Independent. p. 7. Retrieved 15 February 2019.
  15. ^ "Children's Books". Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer. 1 December 1926. p. 5. Retrieved 14 February 2019.
  16. ^ O'Brien, E.D. (8 December 1951). "Books of the Day For the Christmas Holidays". Illustrated London News. p. 41. Retrieved 14 February 2019.
  17. ^ Edgar, Lois (September 1966). "Reviewed Work: The New Noah's Ark of Rare Animals. by Helen Haywood". The Quarterly Review of Biology. The University of Chicago Press. 41 (3): 308. doi:10.1086/405065. JSTOR 2819943.
  18. ^ Lewis, Naomi (18 April 1965). "Books for Children". The Observer Weekend Review. London, England. p. 26. Retrieved 14 February 2019.