Hell Bent

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This article is about the 1918 Western film. For other uses, see Hellbent. For the Doctor Who episode, see Hell Bent (Doctor Who).
Hell Bent
Hell Bent.png
Screenshot
Directed by John Ford
Written by John Ford
Harry Carey
Eugene B. Lewis
Starring Harry Carey
Cinematography Ben F. Reynolds
Distributed by Universal Film Manufacturing Company
Release dates
  • July 6, 1918 (1918-07-06)
Running time
50 minutes
Country United States
Language Silent (English intertitles)

Hell Bent is a 1918 American Western film directed by John Ford and featuring Harry Carey. A print of the film exists in the Czechoslovak Film Archive.[1]

Plot[edit]

As described in a film magazine,[2] Bess Thurston (Gerber), whose no-account brother Jack (Pegg) is unable to support her, obtains employment in a dance hall. This shatters the illusions of Cheyenne Harry (Carey), who has fallen in love with her. When he rescues her from the advances of Beau Ross (Harris), Cheyenne's confidence in her is restored. Her brother then aids Beau in an attempted robbery and Harry allows them to escape. Beau takes Bess with him into the desert. Harry follows and a duel ensues in which they are both wounded. Bess rides the only horse left out of the desert, while Beau and Harry struggle along on foot. A sandstorm results in the death of Beau, but Harry lives to find happiness with Bess.

Cast[edit]

Reception[edit]

Like many American films of the time, Hell Bent was subject to restrictions and cuts by city and state film censorship boards. For example, the Chicago Board of Censors cut, in Reel 1, all scenes of the stage holdup, Reel 4, two scenes of men working at safe, all scenes of holdup on coach, Reel 5, binding man to horse, and three scenes of bandits in cabin shooting.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Progressive Silent Film List: Hell Bent". silentera.com. Retrieved March 1, 2008. 
  2. ^ "Reviews: Hell Bent". Exhibitors Herald (New York City: Exhibitors Herald Company) 7 (4): 42-43. July 20, 1918. 
  3. ^ "Official Cut-Outs by the Chicago Board of Censors". Exhibitors Herald (New York City: Exhibitors Herald Company) 7 (6): 41. August 3, 1918. 

External links[edit]