Help Remedies

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One of the products sold by Help Remedies, acetaminophen.

Help Remedies, Inc. is an American pharmaceutical company, founded by Richard Fine and Nathan Frank in 2008,[1] based in New York City that sells an assortment of single-ingredient over-the-counter medications.[2] The company has been noted for its unique product packaging and design ethic.[3][4][5][6][7] All products are packaged in a flat, white, textured box that opens like a tin.

About[edit]

Help Remedies differ from many other over-the-counter drugs in that each product is made with a single active ingredient, for example, the medicine used to help with a headache only contains acetaminophen. Help Remedy's products also contain less dyes and coatings than many other drugs. Help Remedies' products are intended to exemplify simplicity. All of their products they offer are named based on the specific symptom which it's intended to treat so that customers know what they are taking.[8] In 2011, the company reached $4 million in sales and plans to expand to San Francisco, Seattle, Portland, Oregon, Austin, Texas, Chicago, and Miami.[1]

Remedies[edit]

Help Remedies products treat medical conditions such as nausea, headache or insomnia.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Olson, Elizabeth. "Help Remedies Tries to Cure Ailments in Small Doses - NYT". New York Times. Retrieved 27 February 2013. 
  2. ^ Sax, David. "Help Remedies Hip Pharma". Bloomberg Businessweek. Retrieved 6 April 2012. 
  3. ^ "Shopping With Harry Allen". The New York Times. July 29, 2009. Retrieved December 13, 2011. 
  4. ^ Mangum, Aja (July 17, 2009). "Best Bet: Cute Cure". New Yorker. Retrieved December 13, 2011. 
  5. ^ Devera, Michelle (March 13, 2009). "Bandages". The San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved December 13, 2011. 
  6. ^ Sancton, Julian (July 20, 2009). "Help Remedies Tries the Little Pharma Approach". Vanity Fair. Retrieved December 13, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Little Green Goodies". Women's Health. April 2010. p. 102. 
  8. ^ "Help Remedies". Help. Retrieved 27 February 2013. 

External links[edit]