Henry Whitely

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Henry Whitely was a businessman, railroad executive, and Federalist politician from the U.S. state of Delaware.

Background[edit]

In 1816, Whitely, along with James Price and eight others, were appointed commissioners of the planned Wilmington and Christiana Turnpike.[1]:418

In 1818, he bought a stone house and 100 acres of land in Newark, Delaware. (The house still stands today; in 1983, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places.)

From October 1817 through September 1821, Whitely served in the Delaware House of Representatives.[1]:409

In 1824, he was elected to the state Senate as a delegate from New Castle County. (That same year, he was part of a group of dignitaries appointed to escort the Marquis de Lafayette from the Pennsylvania state line to Wilmington.[1]:308) He served as the Speaker of the Senate in 1827, during the 51st Assembly.[1]:407

In 1833, he became a director of the Farmers' Bank of Delaware.[1]:739

In 1838, he was a director of two of the four railroads that together built the first railroad south from Philadelphia: the Delaware and Maryland Railroad and the Wilmington and Susquehanna Railroad. His service as an early railroad executive is marked on the 1839 Newkirk Viaduct Monument. Much of the right-of-way is today owned by Amtrak as part of its Northeast Corridor.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Scharf, John Thomas (1888). History of Delaware: 1609-1888. Philadelphia: L.J. Richards.