Hiller Ten99

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Hiller Ten99
Hiller Helicopter (3030845194).jpg
Role Experimental helicopter
National origin United States
Manufacturer Hiller Aircraft
First flight July 16, 1961[1]
Number built 1

The Hiller Ten99 (also known as the Hiller 1099) was an American 1961 experimental helicopter, created by Hiller Aircraft.

Design and development[edit]

The helicopter seated six and was similar to other helicopters by Hiller, but featured a larger, box-shaped cabin. It has four doors, and a set of clamshell doors on its aft side.[2] The aircraft was powered by a Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6, and in July 1961, was the first aircraft to have been powered solely by a PT6 engine. The Ten99 was developed for a United States Navy Assault Support Helicopter program. However, the Navy eventually selected the Bell HU-1 instead.[3] A civilian model was proposed, but not produced, and the project was eventually abandoned.

Specifications[edit]

Data from Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1965–66[1]

General characteristics

  • Capacity: 6 people
  • Length: 41 ft 3 in (12.57 m) (overall length)
  • Height: 10 ft 5 in (3.18 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,900 lb (862 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 3,501 lb (1,588 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6 Turboprop, 550 hp (410 kW)
  • Main rotor diameter: 35 ft 8 in (10.86 m)
  • Main rotor area: 997 sq ft (92.6 m2)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Taylor, John W R (1966). Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1966-67. London: Sampson Low, Marston & Co. Ltd. p. 227. 
  2. ^ "PS Picture News: Squared-off Helicopter". Popular Science. Bonnier Corporation. 180 (2): 73. February 1962. ISSN 0161-7370. 
  3. ^ Fleming, William A.; Richard A. Leyes (1999). The history of North American small gas turbine aircraft engines. AIAA. p. 447. ISBN 978-1-56347-332-6. 

References[edit]

  • Apostolo, Giorgio (1984). The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Helicopters. Bonanza Books. ISBN 978-0-517-43935-7. 
  • Taylor, John W. R. (1965). Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1965–66. London: Sampson Low, Marston & Company.