Hoelite

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Hoelite
Hoelite, sulfur - Carolaschacht Mine, Freital, Saxony, Germany.jpg
Yellow acicular crystals of Hoelite (picture size: 10 mm)
General
CategoryOrganic mineral
Formula
(repeating unit)
C14H8O2
Strunz classification10.CA.15
Dana classification50.4.2.1
Crystal systemMonoclinic
Crystal classPrismatic (2/m)
(same H-M symbol)
Space groupP21/a
Unit cella = 15.81 Å, b = 3.967 Å
c = 7.876 Å; β = 102.67°;
Z = 2
Identification
ColorYellow, yellowish green
Crystal habitAcicular clusters; pseudo-orthorhombic
CleavageGood
StreakLight yellow
DiaphaneitySemitransparent
Specific gravity1.42
Optical propertiesBiaxial (+)
Refractive indexnα≈1.75, nβ≈1.75, nγ≈2.0
References[1][2]

Hoelite is a mineral, discovered in 1922 at Mt. Pyramide, Spitsbergen, Norway and named after Norwegian geologist Adolf Hoel (1879–1964). Its chemical formula is C14H8O2 (9,10-anthraquinone).[1]

It is a very rare organic mineral which occurs in coal fire environments in association with sal ammoniac and native sulfur.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Anthony, John W.; Bideaux, Richard A.; Bladh, Kenneth W.; Nichols, Monte C. (eds.). "Hoelite" (PDF). Handbook of Mineralogy. Chantilly, VA: Mineralogical Society of America. Retrieved 12 September 2017.
  2. ^ Barthelmy, Dave. "Hoelite". Mindat.org. Retrieved 12 September 2017.