Hokekyō-ji (Ichikawa)

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Soshidō (1678), an Important Cultural Property; believed to have been modelled on the Honden-Haiden of Kibitsu Jinja

Hokekyō-ji (法華経寺) is a temple of the Nichiren-shū[1] founded during the Kamakura period in Ichikawa, Chiba Prefecture, Japan. One of Nichiren’s most important writings the Risshō Ankoku Ron,[2] regarded as one of the National Treasures of Japan, is kept at the temple. Next to other documents it is being presented to the public on 3 November each year.

Buildings[edit]

Restoration of the Soshidō[edit]

When the Soshidō (祖師堂) was dismantled for repairs in 1987, evidence from the fabric and forty-five wooden tablets that were found suggested that the original form had been altered in the rebuilding of 1741. It was understood that originally the building resembled the Honden-Haiden of Kibitsu Jinja and, after an inscription was founded by the master carpenter of 1678 who came from that area, the hall was remodelled on that basis. A wooden shingle roof was installed and the old copper sold off for use by sculptors.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nichiren Shū: Hokekyō-ji (Ichikawa)
  2. ^ Commentated version of the Rissho Ankoku Ron:[1]
  3. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 4 May 2011. 
  4. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 4 May 2011. 
  5. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 4 May 2011. 
  6. ^ "Database of Registered National Cultural Properties". Agency for Cultural Affairs. Retrieved 4 May 2011. 
  7. ^ Larsen, Knut Einar (1994). Architectural Preservation in Japan. ICOMOS International Wood Committee. pp. 121–5. ISBN 82-519-1432-9. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 35°43′15″N 139°56′57″E / 35.72083°N 139.94917°E / 35.72083; 139.94917