Hortense Flexner

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Hortense Flexner King (April 12, 1885 – September 28, 1973) was an American poet, playwright, and professor.

Life[edit]

She attended Bryn Mawr College. She graduated from the University of Michigan, with a B.A. in 1907, and a M.A. in 1910.[1] She worked for the Louisville Herald.

She married Wyncie King (1884–1961). They moved to Philadelphia. He was a contributor to the Saturday Evening Post. She taught at Bryn Mawr, from 1926 to 1940, and at Sarah Lawrence College from 1942 to 1950.[2] They were friends of Susan Clay Sawitzky,[3] and Martha Gellhorn.[4]

In 1961, she returned to Louisville.[5] Marguerite Yourcenar translated her poetry into French.[6]

Her papers are held at the University of Louisville.[7]

Works[edit]

Poetry
  • Clouds and Cobblestones 1920.
  • The Stubborn Root and Other Poems (1930)
  • North Window and Other Poems (1943)
  • Poems (1961)
  • Selected Poems (1963), with an introduction by English poet Laurie Lee
  • Marguerite Yourcenar (ed.) Presentation Critique d'Hortense Flexner Suivie d'un Choix de Poems (1969),
  • The Selected Poems of Hortense Flexner (1975)
  • Half a Star: Poems by Hortense Flexner
Plays
  • Voices (1916)
  • Mahogany (1921)
  • The Faun (1921)
  • The Broken God
  • The Road
  • The Little Miracle
  • Three Wise Men of Gotham

References[edit]

  1. ^ "A Maine Writer: Maine State Library". 
  2. ^ "Sarah Lawrence Magazine: The Value of Money". Slc.edu. Retrieved 2011-08-11. 
  3. ^ Lindsey Apple (1997). Cautious rebel: a biography of Susan Clay Sawitzky. Kent State University Press. ISBN 978-0-87338-579-4. 
  4. ^ Caroline Moorehead (2004). Gellhorn: A Twentieth-Century Life. Macmillan. ISBN 978-0-8050-7696-7. 
  5. ^ Kleber, John E. (2001). The encyclopedia of Louisville. University Press of Kentucky. ISBN 978-0-8131-2890-0. 
  6. ^ Alesch, Jeanine S. (1 January 2007). "Une femme obscure: Marguerite Yourcenar Translates Hortense Flexner". Dalhousie French Studies. 78: 83–106. doi:10.2307/40838379 (inactive 2016-08-22). JSTOR 40838379. 
  7. ^ "Hortense Flexner (King) Papers". University of Louisville. Retrieved 23 April 2013. 

External links[edit]