Humala administration

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Ollanta Humala began his presidency when he was sworn into the office of President of the Republic of Peru on 28 July 2011. On the same day, he represented his cabinet, headed by the non-partisan Salomón Lerner Ghitis. On 10 December 2011, Lerner stepped down, following fierce protests against a mining project.[1] He was replaced by Interior Minister Oscar Valdés. The next day, Valdés presented a new cabinet, having replaced eleven ministers.[2]

Humala's Second Vice President Omar Chehade was temporarily suspended by Congress on 5 December 2011, facing corruption allegations.[3] On 16 January 2012, Chehade resigned permanently.[4]

Presidential Cabinet chaired by Salomón Lerner[edit]

Cabinet of Peru from 28 July to 11 December 2011
Position Name
President of the Republic Ollanta Humala (PNP)
First Vice President Marisol Espinoza (PNP)
Second Vice President Omar Chehade (temporarily impeached on 5 December)
Prime Minister Salomon Lerner
Minister of Foreign Relations Rafael Roncagliolo
Minister of Defense Daniel Mora (PP)
Minister of Agriculture Miguel Caillaux
Minister of Labor and Promotion of Employment Rudecindo Vega (PP)
Minister of Women and Social Development Aída García-Naranjo (PS)
Minister of Economy and Finance Miguel Castilla
Minister of Transportation and Communications Carlos Paredes Rodríguez
Minister of Housing, Construction and Sanitation René Cornejo
Minister of Foreign Commerce and Tourism José Luis Silva Martinot
Minister of Production Kurt Burneo (PP)
Minister of Health Alberto Tejada Noriega
Minister of Energy and Mines Carlos Herrera Descalzi
Minister of Education Patricia Salas
Minister of the Interior Oscar Valdés
Minister of Justice Francisco Eguiguren
Minister of Environment Ricardo Giesecke
Minister of Culture Susana Baca
Minister of Development and Social Inclusion Kurt Burneo (PP)

[5][6][7]

Presidential Cabinet chaired by Oscar Valdés[edit]

Cabinet of Peru since 14 May 2012
Position Name
President of the Republic Ollanta Humala
First Vice President Marisol Espinoza
Second Vice President Omar Chehade (temporarily impeached on 5 December 2011,
resigned on 16 January 2012)
Prime Minister Oscar Valdés
Minister of Foreign Relations Rafael Roncagliolo
Minister of Defense José Urquizo
Minister of Agriculture Luis Ginocchio
Minister of Labor and Promotion of Employment José Villena
Minister of Women and Social Development Ana Jara
Minister of Economy and Finance Miguel Castilla
Minister of Transportation and Communications Carlos Paredes Rodríguez
Minister of Housing, Construction and Sanitation René Cornejo
Minister of Foreign Commerce and Tourism José Luis Silva Martinot
Minister of Production Gladys Triveño
Minister of Health Alberto Tejada Noriega
Minister of Energy and Mines Jorge Merino Tafur
Minister of Education Patricia Salas
Minister of the Interior Wilber Calle
Minister of Justice Juan Jiménez Mayor
Minister of Environment Manuel Pulgar Vidal
Minister of Culture Luis Peirano
Minister of Development and Social Inclusion Carolina Trivelli

[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Peruvian Cabinet chief Salomon Lerner steps down; interior minister takes over post", The Washington Post, 11 December 2011, retrieved 11 December 2011 
  2. ^ Peru's President Humala swears in new cabinet, BBC News, 12 December 2011, retrieved 16 December 2011 
  3. ^ "Peru's Vice President suspended for 120 days, due to Andahuasi scandal", Peru This Week, 5 December 2011, retrieved 11 December 2011 
  4. ^ "Omar Chehade renunció a la segunda vicepresidencia". El Comercio Perú. 16 January 2012. Retrieved 17 October 2013. 
  5. ^ El primer gabinete de humala jura y queda en funciones, Télam, 28 July 2011 (in Spanish). Accessed on 26 Aug 2011
  6. ^ Los ministros de Humala son profesionales y empresarios, HoyBolivia.com, 28 July 2011 (in Spanish). Accessed on 26 Aug 2011
  7. ^ Composition du gouvernement de la République du Pérou, France-Diplomatie, French Ministry of Foreign and Europeen Affairs (in French). Accessed on 26 Aug 2011
  8. ^ Estos son los ministros que conforman el gabinete de Óscar Valdés Dancuart, El Comercio, 11 December 2011 (in Spanish), retrieved 23 January 2011