Hypodactylus

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Hypodactylus
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Amphibia
Order: Anura
Family: Craugastoridae
Subfamily: Holoadeninae
Genus: Hypodactylus
Hedges, Duellman (fr), and Heinicke, 2008[1]
Type species
Eleutherodactylus elassodiscus
Lynch (fr), 1973
Synonyms[3]

Isodactylus Hedges, Duellman, and Heinicke, 2008[2] — junior homonym of Isodactylus Gray, 1845[1]

Hypodactylus is a genus of frogs found in northern South America (from central Peru to Ecuador and Colombia). It is currently placed in family Craugastoridae,[3] although the AmphibiaWeb places it in the family Strabomantidae.[4]

Description[edit]

Hypodactylus have head that is narrower than the body. The tympanic membrane is differentiated, but in some species only the tympanic annulus is visible under skin. The dorsum is smooth to weakly tuberculate, whereas the venter is always smooth. The terminal discs on digits are not expanded but usually bear weak circumferential grooves. The terminal phalanges are narrow and T-shaped. Toes III and V are about equal in length (the origin of the name Isodactylus). The smallest species is Hypodactylus adercus where males measure 19 mm (0.75 in) in snout–vent length.[2]

Species[edit]

As of 2017, the genus contains these 12 species:[3][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Hedges, S. B.; Duellman, W. E.; Heinicke, M. P (2008). "A replacement name for Isodactylus Hedges, Duellman, and Heinicke, 2008" (PDF). Zootaxa. 1795: 67–68. 
  2. ^ a b Hedges, S. B.; Duellman, W. E.; Heinicke, M. P (2008). "New World direct-developing frogs (Anura: Terrarana): Molecular phylogeny, classification, biogeography, and conservation" (PDF). Zootaxa. 1737: 1–182. 
  3. ^ a b c Frost, Darrel R. (2017). "Hypodactylus Hedges, Duellman, and Heinicke, 2008". Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6.0. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 20 October 2017. 
  4. ^ a b "Strabomantidae". AmphibiaWeb: Information on amphibian biology and conservation. [web application]. 2017. Retrieved 20 October 2017.