Jacob Bitzer

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Jacob Bitzer
Jacob Bitzer.png
Member of the
Massachusetts House of Representatives
27th Middlesex District [1]
Preceded by Winfield F. Prime[2]
Succeeded by Charles C. Warren[3]
Majority 562 (1914);[4]
964 (1917);[5]
1,735 (1918)
Member of the
Arlington, Massachusetts
Board of Selectmen [1]
In office
1910–1914
Personal details
Born January 16, 1865[1]
Dürrwangen,[6] Württeberg, Germany[1]
Political party Republican[1]
Residence 49 Forest Street, Arlington, Massachusetts;[6]
1130 Massachusetts Avenue, Arlington, Massachusetts[6]
Alma mater Cutter School, Arlington, Massachusetts, (1879).[6]
Occupation Assistant superintendent of the Schwamb Mill[7]
Real Estate[1]

Jacob Bitzer (January 16, 1865- ) was an American businessman, real estate agent, and politician who served as a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives.[1]

Early life[edit]

Bitzer was born to John and Dorothea (Beck) Bitzer on January 16, 1865[1] in Dürrwangen,[6] Württeberg, Germany.[1][5]

Education[edit]

Bitzer attended the Cutter School in Arlington, Massachusetts, graduating in 1879.[6]

Business career[edit]

After he graduated from the Cutter School, Bitzer started a six-year apprentice working for the Welch & Griffiths saw works in Arlington.[6] At the end of his apprenticeship the company went out of business.[6] After he left the employ of Welch & Griffiths Bitzer went to work as a mill hand, on an irregular moulding machine, in the mill of Theodore Schwamb, a manufacturer of piano cases.[6]

In 1897, when the Schwamb Mill was incorporated, Bitzer became a stockholder, and clerk of the corporation. In 1908 Bitzer was the assistant superintendent of the mill in charge of the mill department.[7]

Republican National Convention[edit]

Bitzer was an alternative delegate to the Republican National Convention of 1912.[5]

Massachusetts House of Representatives[edit]

On November 3, 1914 Bitzer was elected a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives representing the twenty seventh Middlesex District, Bitzer received 1,372 in a three way race that included fellow Arlington Resident Cyrus Edwin Dallin; James F. McCarthy of Lexington, Massachusetts.[4] Bitzer served in the legislature from 1915 to 1919.[1][3][5][8] During the 1917 legislative session Bitzer was a member of the Committee on Public Institutions,[9] and the Committee on Ways and Means.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Howard, Richard T. (1919), Public Officials of Massachusetts, 1919, Boston, MA: The Boston Review, p. 109.
  2. ^ Who's Who in State Politics, 1914, Boston, MA: Practical Politics, 1914, p. 288.
  3. ^ a b Howard, Richard T. (1923), Public Officials of Massachusetts, 1920, Boston, MA: The Boston Review, p. 299.
  4. ^ a b Swan, Charles W. (1915), Annual Report, Town of Lexington, Massachusetts, Lexington, Massachusetts: Lexington, Massachusetts, p. 99.
  5. ^ a b c d Bridgman, Arthur Milnor (1917), A Souvenir of Massachusetts Legislators Vol. XXVI, Stoughton, Ma: A. M. Bridgman, p. 112.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i Cutter, William Richard (1908), Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of Boston and Eastern Massachusetts, Boston, MA: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, p. 2144.
  7. ^ a b c Cutter, William Richard (1908), Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of Boston and Eastern Massachusetts, Boston, MA: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, p. 2145.
  8. ^ Who's Who in State Politics, 1918, Boston, MA: Practical Politics, 1918, p. 126.
  9. ^ Bridgman, Arthur Milnor (1917), A Souvenir of Massachusetts Legislators Vol. XXVI, Stoughton, Ma: A. M. Bridgman, p. 57.
  10. ^ Bridgman, Arthur Milnor (1917), A Souvenir of Massachusetts Legislators Vol. XXVI, Stoughton, Ma: A. M. Bridgman, p. 79.
Political offices
Preceded by
Winfield F. Prime
Member of the
Massachusetts House of Representatives
27th Middlesex district

1915-1919
Succeeded by
Charles C. Warren