James Dick-Cunyngham

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
James Dick-Cunyngham
Born 28 March 1877
Died 1935
Allegiance United Kingdom United Kingdom
Service/branch Flag of the British Army.svg British Army
Years of service 1898 - 1935
Rank Major-General
Commands held 152nd (Seaforth and Cameron) Infantry Brigade
4th Division
South-Eastern Command
Battles/wars World War I
Awards Companion of the Order of the Bath
Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George
Distinguished Service Order

Major General James Keith Dick-Cunyngham, CB, CMG, DSO (28 March 1877 - 1935) was a British Army officer who commanded 4th Division.

Military career[edit]

Educated at Cheltenham College,[1] Dick-Cunyngham was commissioned into the Gordon Highlanders in 1898.[2] He served in the Second Boer War and was appointed a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order (DSO), which he received from King Edward VII during an investiture at St. James′s Palace on 2 June 1902.[3] He later served in the World War I briefly commanding 152nd (Seaforth and Cameron) Infantry Brigade before being taken prisoner-of-war at Le Cornet Malo in Northern France in April 1918.[4] After the War he became Assistant Adjutant General at the War Office.[2] He was appointed Commander of 152nd (Seaforth and Cameron) Infantry Brigade again in 1927 and then took a tour as Brigadier-General on the General Staff at Southern Command in India before becoming General Officer Commanding 53rd (Welsh) Division in 1932.[2] His last appointment was as General Officer Commanding 4th Division in June 1935 before he died in November 1935.[2]

Family[edit]

In 1905 he married Alice Daisy Deane; they had two daughters.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Anglo-Boer War
  2. ^ a b c d Liddell Hart Centre for Military Archives
  3. ^ "The King´s Levee and Investiture". The Times (36784). London. 3 June 1902. p. 10. 
  4. ^ The 51st Division War Sketches
Military offices
Preceded by
John Brind
General Officer Commanding the 4th Division
June 1935–November 1935
Succeeded by
Clive Liddell